Tag Archives: Pope Francis

Pope Francis lauds dialogue ahead of meeting with Iraqi Grand Cleric

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Iraq once counted more than 1.5 million Christians but today only an estimated 400,000 Christians remain after being ravaged by violence

Pope Francis hailed the power of inter-religious dialogue on Monday as the Vatican confirmed he would meet Shiite cleric Grand Ayatollah Ali Sistani during his forthcoming trip to Iraq.

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The March 5-8 visit — the first-ever by a pope — will include stops in Baghdad, Najaf, Nasiriya, Erbil, Mosul and Qaraqosh, according to the official itinerary published by the Vatican.

On March 6, the pontiff is scheduled to make a “courtesy visit” to the 90-year-old Sistani in Najaf.

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The pope had previously suggested his visit to Iraq might be cancelled because of the coronavirus pandemic, but on Monday, made clear his desire to go.

This photo taken on February 7, 2021 and handout by the Vatican Media on February 8, 2021 shows Pope Francis waving from the window of the apostolic palace overlooking St. Peter’s Square during the weekly Angelus prayer in the Vatican, during the Covid-19 pandemic. (Photo by Handout / VATICAN MEDIA / AFP) / RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE – MANDATORY CREDIT “AFP PHOTO /VATICAN MEDIA / HANDOUT “

“I myself wish to resume my Apostolic Visits, beginning with that to Iraq,” he told ambassadors to the Holy See.

“These visits are an important sign of the solicitude of the Successor of Peter (the pope) for God’s People spread throughout the world and the dialogue of the Holy See with states,” he said.

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“They also frequently provide an opportunity to promote, in a spirit of sharing and dialogue, good relations between the different religions.”

Inter-religious dialogue, he added, “can become an opportunity for religious leaders and the followers of different confessions, and can support the responsible efforts of political leaders to promote the common good”.

Last month, the patriarch of Iraq’s Chaldean Catholic Church Louis Sako said the pope would have a private visit with Sistani, who is never seen in public and rarely accepts visitors.

Sako said then he hoped the two religious leaders would sign the document on “human fraternity for world peace”, an inter-religious text condemning extremism that Francis signed in 2019 with the leading Sunni cleric Sheikh Ahmed al-Tayeb, the grand imam of Al-Azhar.

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Iraq once counted more than 1.5 million Christians but today only an estimated 400,000 Christians remain after being ravaged by violence, most recently sectarian warfare that followed the 2003 US-led invasion and attacks by Islamic State.

Francis plans to celebrate Masses at Baghdad in a cathedral that was the site of a 2010 bloody attack and in a stadium in Erbil, the capital of Iraq’s Kurdish region, where many Christians have fled after being displaced by Islamic State.

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#Newsworthy

Pope Francis preaches solidarity with Myanmar residents.

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There have been reports of large protests Sunday against the military regime in several cities across Myanmar.

Pope Francis on Sunday expressed “solidarity with the people of Myanmar” following last week’s military coup, urging the army to work towards “democratic coexistence” as thousands demonstrate in the streets.

The pope was speaking as tens of thousands of protesters poured on to the streets of Yangon in the biggest rally yet against Monday’s military coup.

“I pray that those in power in the country will work… towards the common good,” he said from the balcony overlooking St Peter’s Square after his recital of the Angelus prayer Sunday.

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The pope, who visited Myanmar in 2017, called for “social justice, national stability and harmonious democratic coexistence”.

There have been reports of large protests Sunday against the military regime in several cities across Myanmar.

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#Newsworthy

Catholic Pope, Francis ‘defile all odds’ in new appointment.

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A special synod on the Amazon in 2019 saw 35 female “auditors” invited to the assembly, but none could vote.

Pope Francis has broken with Catholic tradition to appoint a woman as an undersecretary of the synod of bishops, the first to hold the post with voting rights in a body that studies major questions of doctrine.

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Frenchwoman Nathalie Becquart is one of the two new undersecretaries named Saturday to the synod, where she has been a consultant since 2019.

File Photo: French National, Nathalie Becquart appointed as first ever senior synod under Pope Francis’ ruling

The appointment signals the pontiff’s desire “for a greater participation of women in the process of discernment and decision-making in the church”, said Cardinal Mario Grech, the secretary-general of the synod.

“During the previous synods, the number of women participating as experts and listeners has increased,” he said.

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“With the nomination of Sister Nathalie Becquart and her possibility of participating in voting, a door has opened.”

The synod is led by bishops and cardinals who have voting rights and also comprises experts who cannot vote, with the next gathering scheduled for autumn 2022.

A special synod on the Amazon in 2019 saw 35 female “auditors” invited to the assembly, but none could vote.

The Argentinian-born pope has signalled his wish to reform the synod and have women and laypeople play a greater role in the church.

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He named Spaniard Luis Marin de San Martin as the other under undersecretary in the synod of bishops.

Becquart, 52, a member of the France-based Xaviere Sisters, has a master’s degree in management from the prestigious HEC business school in Paris and studied in Boston before joining the order.

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#Newsworthy

Pope Francis snubs Catholic rules to appoint first ever woman as senior synod.

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The Argentinian-born pope has signalled his wish to reform the synod and have women and laypeople play a greater role in the church.

Pope Francis has broken with Catholic tradition to appoint a woman as an undersecretary of the synod of bishops, the first to hold the post with voting rights in a body that studies major questions of doctrine.

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Frenchwoman Nathalie Becquart is one of the two new undersecretaries named Saturday to the synod, where she has been a consultant since 2019.

The appointment signals the pontiff’s desire “for a greater participation of women in the process of discernment and decision-making in the church”, said Cardinal Mario Grech, the secretary-general of the synod.

“During the previous synods, the number of women participating as experts and listeners has increased,” he said.

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“With the nomination of Sister Nathalie Becquart and her possibility of participating in voting, a door has opened.”

The synod is led by bishops and cardinals who have voting rights and also comprises experts who cannot vote, with the next gathering scheduled for autumn 2022.

A special synod on the Amazon in 2019 saw 35 female “auditors” invited to the assembly, but none could vote.

The Argentinian-born pope has signalled his wish to reform the synod and have women and laypeople play a greater role in the church.

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He named Spaniard Luis Marin de San Martin as the other under undersecretary in the synod of bishops.

Becquart, 52, a member of the France-based Xaviere Sisters, has a master’s degree in management from the prestigious HEC business school in Paris and studied in Boston before joining the order.

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#Newsworthy

Sciatica forces Pope Francis to skip New Year masses

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The chronic nerve condition that causes hip pain for the 84-year-old meant that “celebrations this evening and tomorrow morning… will not be led by the Holy Father,” Vatican spokesman Matteo Bruni said in a statement.

Pope Francis will be unable to celebrate New Year’s masses Thursday evening and Friday morning at St Peter’s Basilica because he is suffering from sciatica, the Vatican announced.

Giovanni Battista Re, the dean of the College of Cardinals, will celebrate the vespers on Thursday, while Vatican Secretary of State Pietro Parolin — the pope’s right-hand man — will preside over the New Year’s Day mass, Bruni said.

Later Friday, the pontiff will lead the Angelus prayer from the library in the Apostolic Palace “as planned”, the spokesman said.

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Shortly before Christmas, two cardinals in the pope’s entourage contracted Covid-19, raising fears that Francis, who rarely wears a mask, risked infection.

In addition to the Argentinian-born pope’s official events reported by the Holy See’s press office, he also has many private meetings at the Vatican’s guest house Santa Marta, where he lives.

During Italy’s first lockdown in March, Francis initially delivered his Sunday Angelus prayers from the Vatican library instead of his usual window overlooking crowds on Saint Peter’s Square.

The restriction prompted him to say he felt “caged”, and he made several brief appearances at the window, greeting the few people who ventured out into the vast square.

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The pope has a risk factor for Covid aside from his advanced age. When he was 21 years old in 1957, he suffered from severe pleurisy, requiring surgery to remove part of his right lung, according to biographer Austen Ivereigh.

The Vatican has not yet indicated when the pope may be vaccinated against Covid-19.

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#Newsworthy

“Extremely frail” Vatican says Pope Francis not in bad health

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The Vatican on Monday said former pope Benedict XVI was not in especially bad health after his biographer told a German newspaper he was “extremely frail”.

Pope emeritus Benedict’s health “is no cause for particular concern, especially regarding a 93-year-old person getting over the most acute phase of a painful illness,” the Vatican press office said citing his personal secretary Georg Gaensewein.

Citing the former pope’s biographer Peter Seewald, Bavarian newspaper the Passauer Neue Presse reported that Benedict is suffering from erysipelas of the face, a virus that causes a facial rash and episodes of severe pain.

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“According to Seewald, the pope emeritus is now extremely frail,” the report read. “His thinking and his memory are quick, but his voice is hardly audible at the moment.”

This handout picture released on February 15, 2018 by the Vatican press office shows Pope Francis (L) greeting Pope Benedict XVI at the Vatican, on June 28, 2017. HO / OSSERVATORE ROMANO / AFP

Seewald reportedly visited Benedict in Rome on Saturday to present him with his biography.

“At the meeting the emeritus pope, despite his illness, was optimistic and declared that if his strength increased again he would possibly take up his pen again,” the paper said.

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Benedict visited his sick brother Georg in Germany in June, marking his first trip out of Italy since his shock resignation in 2013.

Georg Ratzinger died just two weeks later, aged 96.

The former pontiff, whose original name is Joseph Ratzinger, now lives in a small former monastery inside the Vatican.

This file photo taken on June 22, 2020 shows former pope Benedict XVI posing for a picture at the airport in Munich, southern Germany, after visiting his brother and before his departure. Sven Hoppe / POOL / AFP

He has largely stayed out of the public eye since he became the first pope in 600 years to resign, citing health reasons.

A traditionalist in the Catholic Church, he was replaced by the reformist Pope Francis.


#Newsworthy…

Pope Francis frowns at hell of migrant detention camps in Libya

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Pope Francis on Wednesday condemned the “hellish” migrant detention camps in Libya on the seventh anniversary of his trip to Lampedusa, where many of those fleeing the country for Europe by sea land.

“The war is indeed horrible, we know that, but you cannot imagine the hell that people are living there, in that detention camp. And those people came only with hope of crossing the sea,” he said during a mass at his residence at the Vatican.

In July 2013, the newly elected Pope Francis chose the tiny Mediterranean island for his first trip outside of Rome, where he denounced the “globalisation of indifference” towards migrants.

“I remember that day, seven years ago, in the very south of Europe, on that island…,” he said.

“A number of people told me their stories and all that they had gone through to get there.

“There were interpreters present. One person was telling me about terrible things in his language, and the interpreter seemed to translate well, but this person spoke so long and the translation was brief,” he said.

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Francis later found out the translator had “given me the ‘distilled’ version.

“This is what is happening today with Libya: they are giving us a ‘distilled version’,” he said.

This photo taken and released on April 13, 2020, by the Vatican Media shows Pope Francis delivering his message during a private Angelus prayer live broadcast from the library of the Apostolic Palace in the Vatican on Easter Monday, during the lockdown aimed at curbing the spread of the COVID-19 infection, caused by the novel coronavirus. Handout / VATICAN MEDIA / AFP.

Francis regularly expresses solidarity with migrants who cross the Mediterranean and mourns those who lose their lives in the attempt.

He has repeatedly slammed the refusal of richer nations to welcome the refugees.


#Newsworthy…

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George Floyd’s Death: Pope Francis React.


The pontiff, in his address at the Vatican City, said that rape is a societal ill that should never be tolerated or ignored.

The Pontiff who condemned the violence that followed George Floyd‘s death also termed it “self-destructive and self-defeating.”

Pope Francis also said he was praying for Floyd and “all those others who have lost their lives as a result of the sin of racism.”


#Newsworthy…

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COVID-19: Share Vaccine Worldwide – Pope Francis demand.

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Pope Francis has called for international scientific cooperation so that every country of the world will take share in coronavirus vaccine when it’s ready.

The Pope who was speaking from the papal library at the Vatican while delivering his Sunday service address today, said any successful vaccine developed should be made available around the world to benefit all of humanity.

Pope Francis also thanked all those around the world, providing essential services.

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“In fact, it is important to unite scientific capabilities, in a transparent and impartial way to find vaccines and treatments,” he said.

”It is also important to guarantee universal access to essential technologies that allow each infected person, in every part of the world, to receive the necessary medical treatment.”


#Newsworthy…

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Pope Francis Livestream Palm Sunday over COVID-19 pandemic.


Pope Francis called for courage in the face of the coronavirus pandemic as he delivered Palm Sunday mass by livestream instead of before Saint Peter’s Square crowds.

The Vatican is abandoning centuries of tradition and refraining from public celebrations of the official start of the Catholic world’s Holy Week.


Pope Francis called the pandemic a tragedy on Sunday that must be faced with courage and hope.

“Today, in the tragedy of a pandemic, in the face of the many false securities that have now crumbled, in the face of so many hopes betrayed, in the sense of abandonment that weighs upon our hearts, Jesus says to each one of us: ‘Courage, open your heart to my love’,” the pope said.


Palm Sunday marks the arrival of Jesus in Jerusalem before his crucifixion. Easter Sunday on April 12 celebrates his resurrection from the dead.

But many of the world’s 1.3 billion Catholics are observing the sacred days under home confinement — just like the 83-year-old pontiff.


Pope Francis has been communicating with the outside world by video so that crowds do not gather to see and hear him in one of the world’s most famous squares.

Vatican City itself has been closed to tourists for nearly a month as part of global efforts to stop the spread of a disease that has officially killed more than 65,000 people worldwide.


The Argentine-born pontiff went on to call on the faithful to overcome their fears and remember that they are not alone.

“When we have our back to the wall, when we find ourselves at a dead end, with no light and no way of escape, when it seems that God himself is not responding, we should remember that we are not alone,” the pope said in his prayer.


Pope Francis himself went down with a cold in late February and was reportedly tested for COVID-19 twice as a precaution because seven people in the Vatican have caught the virus.

The Vatican says the pope is now in good health.

Orthodox Christians celebrate Easter a week later on April 19.


#Newsworthy…

COVID-19: Pope Francis in danger – Vatican worker.


Pope Francis is in coronavirus danger after a Vatican worker who lives in his
residence was hospitalised for testing positive for coronavirus.

The unidentified clergyman has lived in the Holy See’s Saint Martha’s guest house for years, reports said.


Pope Francis also uses the building as his residence, to take his meals and for private meetings.

The 83 year-old Pontiff has remained largely secluded since coming down with a cold at the end of last month.


Italy is the epicentre of Europe’s virus outbreak, recording more deaths than China.

Vatican authorities have disinfected the guest house, the NobleReporters reported, quoting Italian papers, La Stampa and Il Messagro. .

Pope Francis has been ‘eating alone in his room for some time’ as a precaution and is in good health, NobleReporters gathered.


#Newsworthy…

COVID-19: Pope Francis blames tax dodgers.


Pope Francis has backed a prominent journalist’s complaint that tax dodgers were partly to blame as Italy’s health facilities struggle to cope with the coronavirus crisis.

Francis, who is secluded in the Vatican and holding his general audiences over the internet instead of before crowds in St. Peter’s Square, spoke in an interview conducted by phone and published in the Rome newspaper La Repubblica on Wednesday.

He said he was “very impressed” by an article by journalist Fabio Fazio, who listed 15 lessons he learned from coronavirus crisis, and quoted one of them in its entirety.

Italy’s chronically under-funded public hospitals have been pushed to breaking point at the epicentre of the contagion in the north and as others in less affluent regions scrambled to prepare for an onslaught.

Fazio wrote that the crisis should spur people to appreciate what really matters in life, such as personal relationships, solidarity and respect for the environment and to demand that politicians govern with responsibility.

According to Italian Treasury figures last September, tax dodgers cost the country 109 billion euros on average each year between 2013 and 2015. Italy has the highest level of Value Added Tax evasion in the EU, the European Commission says.

“It has become evident that those who do not pay taxes do not only commit a felony but also a crime: if there are not enough hospital beds and artificial respirators, it is also their fault,” Francis quoted verbatim from the article.

According to Italian Treasury figures last September, tax dodgers cost the country 109 billion euros on average each year between 2013 and 2015. Italy has the highest level of Value Added Tax evasion in the EU, the European Commission says.

The death toll in Italy rose to 2,503 on Tuesday and at his Wednesday audience Francis, who has condemned tax evasion in the past, praised Italian medical staff and volunteers who he said were risking their lives to help the sick.

Italy spends more of its budget on healthcare than any sector apart from pensions and has been cutting health costs for decades.

Under pressure to curb the euro zone’s second-largest public debt, Italian governments have slashed funding for regions and in turn regional authorities have targeted health spending, one of the largest items on their own budget.

As a result, the number of hospital beds per inhabitant in Italy has fallen to among the lowest in the euro zone.

Over the past three weeks, 1,135 people have needed intensive care in Lombardy, the northern region hardest hit. It has only 800 intensive care beds, according to Giacomo Grasselli, head of the intensive care unit at Milan’s Policlinico hospital.

Authorities have been working to set up hundreds of intensive care beds in a specially created spaces in Milan and Rome but are still waiting for sufficient respirators and qualified personnel.


#Newsworthy…

COVID-19: Pope Francis tested after illness


Pope Francis has been tested for coronavirus after he fell ill and was forced to cancel a religious retreat near Rome, NobleReporters learnt

The pontiff had been due to go to a Lent retreat, but he did not go – the first time he has not attended the event during his papacy – because he was suffering from a heavy cold.


The results for Covid-19 came back negative, according to Italian newspaper Il Messaggero this morning.

Vatican spokesman Matteo Bruni said he had no immediate comment on the report.


The 83-year-old Roman Catholic leader, who had part of one lung removed because of an illness decades ago, also canceled most audiences last week.

Francis was to have taken part in the week-long retreat with senior Vatican officials that began on Sunday night at a Church residence south of Rome.

But in a surprise announcement hours earlier, he said he would be following it from his residence in a Vatican guest house.

He has been taken ill at a time when Italy is battling a surging outbreak of the potentially deadly coronavirus. The death toll in Italy jumped to 52 on Monday from 34 the day before and the total number of confirmed cases in Europe’s worst affected country climbed past the 2,000 marks.


#Newsworthy…

[Photos] Pope Francis make 1st public appearance following illness


Pope Francis has made his first public appearance in four days after he said he had a “slight indisposition” which forced him to cancel all official audiences and activities.

On Sunday, the 83-year-old pontiff addressed thousands of people from the window of the Vatican’s Apostolic Palace in St. Peter’s Square for his weekly Sunday noon message and blessing.


Pope Francis makes first public appearance following illness, confirms he

It was his first public appearance since the Ash Wednesday Mass in Rome, where he was seen coughing and sneezing amid fears in Italy over an outbreak of coronavirus.

The pontiff prayed for coronavirus sufferers on Ash Wednesday, while mask free, and even took time to shake hands and kiss worshippers, including a child, in St Peter’s Square at the Vatican. N.Rs heard

During his weekly Sunday address, Pope Francis told pilgrims that he is canceling a planned spiritual retreat due to start later today because of a cold.

Pope Francis makes first public appearance following illness, confirms he

‘Unfortunately, a cold will force me not take part this year [in the retreat]. I will follow the meditations from here.’

The pope and senior Vatican officials were due to travel for their annual week-long Lenten spiritual retreat before he made the announcement to skip the week-long Lenten spiritual event.

The pontiff was later seen coughing as he recited the Angelus noon prayer from the window of his studio overlooking St. Peter’s Square.


#Newsworthy…

Pope Francis’s ailment, Coronavirus. [Isn’t that what you’re thinking?]


Head of the Roman Catholic Church, Pope Francis, has missed a planned mass with clergymen in Rome, Italy, due to an unspecified illness.

The 83-year-old pontiff is said to have had a ‘slight indisposition’ but would proceed with the rest of his activities for the day.

There was no word about the nature of his illness but the pope was seen coughing and blowing his nose during Ash Wednesday Mass, N.Rs heard

On Wednesday, he said, “I wish, again, to express my closeness to those who are ill with Coronavirus and to health-care workers who are caring for them.”

The latest development comes after an outbreak of Coronavirus in Italy that has infected more than 400 people and seen 12 deaths.

Rome had three cases, but all were cured.


#Newsworthy…

Update: Pope Francis decision to remove married priests turn Kinsasha


In quashing the idea of married priests in the Amazon, Pope Francis has appeased traditionalists while disappointing progressives who had hoped for a historic turning point in the Catholic church.

In his “apostolic exhortation” on the Amazon basin published Wednesday, Francis slammed the door on a progressive proposal offered by the region’s bishops during a synod on the region in October.


The synod had suggested that the way to solve a shortage of priests in the remote and inaccessible area was to allow married indigenous men to become priests.

Without even mentioning that proposal, Francis instead argued for more missionary priests in the Amazon and for women and lay people to take on larger roles, falling short of another synod idea to ordain women as deacons in the region.


The Argentine pontiff’s thoughts, coming after months of speculation and hand-wringing within the Vatican, were welcomed by some, including a vocal opponent of Francis, German Cardinal Gerhard Mueller.

For five years Mueller was in charge of church dogma, holding the key Vatican post of Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith until 2017 — when he was not reappointed by Francis.


Mueller saluted the document’s potential for “reducing internal Church factions.”

Conservatives within the Church were outraged by the regional synod’s proposal, even were it to be an exception limited to the Amazon, seeing it as potentially paving the way to the abolition of priest celibacy globally.


US Cardinal Raymond Burke, a staunch traditionalist, suggested last year that Francis would be heading into a “schism” were he to give his stamp of approval to the synod’s proposals.

Failing to reform?
But to others, the text lacked the audacity that has marked the papacy of the first Jesuit pope.


Francis’ document marked a “failure in the reforming impulse of the pontificate,” according to longtime Vatican analyst Marco Politi.

The pope, “abruptly slowed down” by a strong and multifaceted opposition, also disappointed those local Amazon bishops whom he had called on to offer up new ideas to help guide the Church, Politi said.


“Francis finds himself more alone today, having caused disillusionment among a notable mass of his supporters,” Politi said.

Key among them are Catholic feminist organisations, some of whom have been fighting for women’s access to the priesthood.


In his text, Francis cited the contributions of women and argued that their roles be increased, but dismissed the idea of their ordination.

Women’s Ordination Worldwide (WOW) said Francis had “dropped the ball” for women within the Church.


“Francis has opted to perpetuate the shameful elitist men’s club that, as he so brazenly points out in the document, is held up by the second class status of women who do most of the work with none of the recognition,” the group said in a statement.

Still, the issues of women’s ordination, and married priests, are not dead, some say.

The German Church, which contains a strong progressive branch, has just launched a two-year debate on top controversial issues, including the end of priestly celibacy and a greater place for women.

Meanwhile, Brazilian Cardinal Claudio Hummes, a proponent of priestly marriage, sees the question as still open, telling the publication Estadao: “It will be taken up again.”


#Newsworthy…

Pope Francis apologizes after slapping woman.


Pope Francis has apologised for smacking the hand of a female well-wisher who grabbed him and yanked him toward her.

The leader of over one billion Roman catholics said he had lost his patience and set a “bad example”.

His unusual apology came after he used his first homily of the new year to denounce violence against women, which he compared to profaning God.


Pope Francis, 83, had a sharp encounter with a woman on Tuesday evening during a walkabout in St. Peters Square.

The pilgrim, who has not been identified, unexpectedly seized his hand and pulled him towards her, causing him evident alarm. A clearly disgruntled Francis wrenched himself free by slapping down at her arm.


“So many times we lose patience, even me, and I apologise for yesterday’s bad example,” the pope told thousands of pilgrims gathered in St. Peter’s Square on Wednesday at the end of the traditional New Year Mass.

He had used the service to issue a forthright condemnation of the abuse of women in modern society.


“All violence inflicted on women is a desecration of God,” he told a packed St. Peter’s Basilica.

“How often is a woman’s body sacrificed on the profane altar of advertising, profit, pornography,” he said, adding that the female body “must be freed from consumerism, it must be respected and honoured”.


Despite creating life, women “are continually offended, beaten, raped, forced into prostitution” and made to have abortions, he said. “We can understand our level of humanity by the way we treat a woman’s body,” he told the congregation.

During his homily, Francis also addressed another theme close to his heart, immigration, saying women who moved abroad to provide for their children should be honoured, not scorned.


“Today even motherhood is humiliated, because the only growth that interests us is economic growth,” he said.

“There are mothers, who risk perilous journeys to desperately try to give the fruit of the womb a better future and are judged to be redundant by people whose bellies are full of things, but whose hearts are empty of love.”

Pope Francis


The leader of the Roman Catholic Church, which allows only unmarried men to be ordained as priests, also said women “must be fully involved in decision-making processes”.

The pope said last April the Church had to acknowledge a history of male domination and sexual abuse of women. A month later, he appointed for the first time four women to an important Vatican department that prepares the major meetings of world bishops.


#Newsworthy…