Tag Archives: korea

COVID-19: 116 discharged patients in Korea test positive again?


About 116 former coronavirus patients have tested positive for the second time.

They tested negative when discharged from hospitals, according to the Korea Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (KCDC).


They then tested positive days later.

The strange development is now under investigation by the KCDC and the World Health Organisation.


Several theories have been floated to explain the phenomenon, which has also been reported in China.

One, that the re-occurrence of the virus could indicate that the discharged patients failed to build up immunity after they had it.


Two, that the patients in South Korea that tested positive may not have been reinfected.

It may be that the virus is instead “reactivating,” with the patients experiencing something more like a relapse than a second case.


The WHO has told multiple news outlets that it is aware of the 116 patients in South Korea and is investigating.

The trend has also been reported in China: people who have gotten the virus, recovered, tested negative and then tested positive again.

The WHO suggested that this could just all be the result of faulty testing.

“It is important to make sure that when samples are collected for testing on suspected patients, procedures are followed properly,” the WHO told U.S.


#Newsworthy…

Critic’s Notebook: The Liberating Power of the ‘Parasite’ Oscar Win


The awards season success of the film was not only a triumph for South Korea and foreign cinema at large — it was also a kind of unburdening for Asian Americans.
Parasite’s sweep of the Oscars on Sunday night for best original screenplay, international feature film, director and — finally, and most improbably — picture offered up a smorgasbord of joys. As a longtime Bong Joon Ho champion, I was thrilled to see one of cinema’s finest and most unpredictable filmmakers recognized at the peak of his career, and on such a global stage.

Continue reading Critic’s Notebook: The Liberating Power of the ‘Parasite’ Oscar Win

South Korea Erupts in Celebration as ‘Parasite’ Makes Oscars History


The Oscars ceremony aired early Monday morning in Seoul, but that didn’t stop tens of millions in the country from following local hero Bong Joon Ho as he made Oscars history. ‘Parasite’ moved the minds of the world,” tweeted South Korea’s president Moon Jae-in.
South Korean social media was flooded with statements of elation and celebration Monday after local hero Bong Joon Ho and his strikingly original film Parasite swept the 92 Academy Awards.

Bong and Parasite struck gold early Sunday night, first winning the Oscar for best original screenplay. Taking the stage with this co-writer Han Jin-won, Bong thanked the Academy for the “great honor,” while noting that “writing a script is a very lonely process, you never write to represent your country.”

Continue reading South Korea Erupts in Celebration as ‘Parasite’ Makes Oscars History

Donald trump warns NORTH Korea over Hostiles.

…says they have everything to lose

President Donald Trump warned Sunday that North Korea’s Kim Jong Un had “everything” to lose through hostility towards the United States after Pyongyang said it had carried out a major new weapons test.

“Kim Jong Un is too smart and has far too much to lose, everything actually, if he acts in a hostile way,” Trump tweeted in response to the unspecified test at the Sohae space launch center.

The announcement of Saturday’s test came just hours after Trump said he would be “surprised” by any hostile action from the North, emphasizing his “very good relationship” with Kim.

Trump and Kim engaged in months of mutual insults and threats of devastation in 2017, sending tensions soaring before a diplomatic rapprochement the following year.

The pair have met three times since June 2018 but with little progress towards denuclearization. Pyongyang has set Washington a December 31 deadline to make new concessions to kickstart stalled talks.

“North Korea, under the leadership of Kim Jong Un, has tremendous economic potential, but it must denuclearize as promised,” Trump tweeted. “NATO, China, Russia, Japan, and the entire world is unified on this issue!”

Writing that Kim had “signed a strong Denuclearization Agreement” at their June 2018 summit in Singapore,” Trump warned: “He does not want to void his special relationship with the President of the United States or interfere with the U.S. Presidential Election in November.”

A spokesman for North Korea’s Academy of the National Defense Science said Saturday’s “very important test” would have an “important effect” on changing the “strategic position” of North Korea, in a statement carried by the official KCNA news agency.

The statement did not provide further details on the test.

A senior US administration official earlier said Washington had seen reports of a test and was “coordinating closely with allies and partners.”

Trump indicated that military action was still possible when he was asked about Pyongyang on the sidelines of a NATO summit in Britain this week.

North Korea fired back that if the United States used military force it would take “prompt corresponding actions at any level.”

UN diplomats fear that North Korea will resume long-range nuclear or ballistic tests if no progress is made soon in talks with the United States.

Sohae, on North Korea’s northwest coast, is ostensibly a facility designed for putting satellites into orbit.

But Pyongyang has carried out several rocket launches there that were condemned by the US and others as disguised long-range ballistic missile tests.

Following the Singapore summit, Trump said Kim had agreed to destroy “a major missile engine testing site” without naming the facility.

Kim then agreed to shutter the Sohae site during a summit last year with South Korean President Moon Jae-in in Pyongyang as part of trust-building measures.

#Newsworthy…

North Korea dismissed 2 unidentified projectiles in Thanksgiving holiday, US.

North Korea fired two “unidentified projectiles” on Thursday — the Thanksgiving holiday in the US — Seoul said, as nuclear talks between Pyongyang and Washington remain deadlocked.

The projectiles were fired eastwards from South Hamgyong province and came down in the Sea of Japan, also known as the East Sea, South Korea’s Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) said.

They added that the launch, the latest in a series by Pyongyang, was carried out at 16:59 pm local time (0859 GMT) — or the early hours on the east coast of the United States, during one of the country’s biggest annual holidays.

It was also one day short of the two-year anniversary of the North’s first test of its Hwasong-15 intercontinental ballistic missile, which analysts say is capable of reaching the entire US mainland.

Pyongyang is banned from firing ballistic missiles under UN Security Council resolutions, and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said that Thursday’s launch was the latest in a series of violations.

“North Korea’s repeated launches of ballistic missiles are a serious defiance to not only our country but also the international community,” he told reporters in Tokyo.

In Washington, a State Department official said the US was monitoring the situation and consulting with allies in the region.

“We call on North Korea to avoid provocations, abide by obligations under UN Security Council Resolutions, and return to sustained and substantive negotiations to do its part to achieve complete denuclearization,” the official said.

Thursday’s launch came after Pyongyang fired what it called a “super-large multiple rocket launcher” system last month, and the JCS said the latest devices were presumed to be of a similar type.

They flew 380 kilometres (236 miles) and reached a maximum altitude of 97 kilometres, the JCS added.

Nuclear negotiations between the US and the North have been at a standstill since the Hanoi summit between President Donald Trump and leader Kim Jong Un broke up in February, and Pyongyang has since demanded Washington change its approach by the end of the year.

“North Korea is growing anxious as its deadline approaches,” said Shin Beom-chul of the Asan Institute for Policy Studies.

“That’s why it’s carrying out these provocations, which is the typical North Korean playbook to get more concessions from the US.”

Test Moratorium

Last month Pyongyang also claimed to have tested a “new type” of submarine-launched ballistic missile — a potential strategic game-changer.

Trump has played down the recent launches, repeatedly pointing to North Korea’s moratorium on nuclear tests and intercontinental ballistic missile launches as foreign policy successes for him.

Trump and Kim adopted a vaguely-worded statement on the “complete denuclearisation of the Korean peninsula” at their first summit in Singapore in June last year, but little progress has since been made.

North Korea is under multiple sets of international sanctions over its nuclear weapon and ballistic missile programmes and lifting some of them was a key demand of the North’s in Hanoi.

In June, Trump and Kim agreed to restart working-level talks during a meeting at the Demilitarized Zone dividing the peninsula and the two sides met in Sweden in October, only for Pyongyang to walk away.

Earlier this month, Seoul and Washington said they would postpone planned joint military exercises to ease diplomacy with the North, an announcement Pyongyang dismissed.

The North has long condemned the joint drills, which it calls preparations for invasion, and carried out multiple missile launches in the summer in protest as the allies carried out their annual exercises.

North Korea has issued a series of increasingly assertive comments in recent weeks as time runs down on its end-of-year deadline.

Trump hinted at the prospect of a fourth meeting with Kim in a tweet earlier this month, only to be rebuffed by the North, which said it had no interest in summits “that bring nothing to us”.

#Newsworthy…