Tag Archives: grammy

No Grammy Award for 2021.

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The Grammys had already planned on a limited show for 2021, forgoing an audience completely and only allowing presenters and performers on-site during the show.

The 2021 edition of the Grammys has been postponed due to concerns over the spread of COVID-19, according Rolling Stone.

It was originally scheduled for January 31.

Organizers have not confirmed a new date, but it is believed they are aiming to hold the event sometime in March.

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Nominated artists wouldn’t have been allowed on-site either, likely leading to a situation similar to the 2020 Emmys where nominees appeared and accepted awards remotely.

The 2021 Grammy nominations were led by Beyoncé who picked up nine nominations, while Dua Lipa, Taylor Swift and Roddy Ricch followed behind with six nods each.

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#Newsworthy

Kidjo hangs out with Burna boy days after Grammy event ..


Angelique Kidjo, a Beninese singer, has met with Burna Boy, Nigeria’s Afrofusion singer, and Bose Ogulu, his mum, days after winning the Grammys.

The 59-year-old actress and activist, who is known for her diverse musical influences, appeared to have paid a visit to the home of the ‘African Giant’ singer.


The duo took to their social media platforms on Friday to share pictures they took brimming with smiles.

In one of the videos on social media platforms, the talented songster can be seen discussing with Burna Boy and his mum, while the duo listened attentively.


Kidjo had snagged the Recording Academy’s 2020 ‘Best World Music Album’ award in the same award category in which Burna Boy was nominated for his ‘African Giant’ project.

While receiving her gramophone statuette on Sunday, Kidjo had dedicated her win to Burna Boy, describing him as being among those changing the narrative of music-making in the continent.


“He’s among those artistes from Africa that are changing the way that our continent is perceived and the way that Africa’s has been the bedrock of every music,” the four-time Grammy winner had said.

Burna had, following the loss, reassured his fans around the globe of his commitment to music-making, charging the world to get ready for his comeback.


Reacting to the ‘Ye’ crooner’s loss, Nigerians had flared while Naomi Campbell, an English actress, had criticized the Grammy organisers for failing to recognize Afrobeats as an award category.

“Afrobeats is a musical genre played on mainstream and primetime radio not only across the continent of Africa but across the world,” Campbell wrote in an open letter to the Academy.


“Recently, the genre was put in your ‘World Music’ category at the 2020 Grammys. This misrepresentation diminishes an entire genre in which such a high standard of talent has emerged.

“Did the world get to vote for this award? What will this neglectful categorization of music mean to individual cultures who contribute their blood, sweat, tears, and every level of their creativity?”

https://www.instagram.com/angeliquekidjo/?utm_source=ig_embed&ig_mid=3DADAAD7-6E5B-4F70-A341-6CEAAEF76F47

Video

https://www.instagram.com/tundeednut/?utm_source=ig_embed&ig_mid=3DADAAD7-6E5B-4F70-A341-6CEAAEF76F47


#Newsworthy …

Grammy winner, Kidjo meets Asa, spoke fluent Yoruba (Video) ..


Grammy winner Angelique Kidjo is currently in Lagos, Nigeria, and she visited Smooth FM this morning for an interview.

While saying hello to the staff at the studio, Angelique spoke fluent Yoruba.

Nigerian singer Asa also visited the studio and both women were happy to see each other.


Angelique is seen drawing Asa in for a long hug before complimenting her footwear. They also spoke Yoruba to each other.

Angelique Kidjo, who will be performing in Lagos, Nigeria, said it will be her first time performing in the state.

“This is my first time in Lagos… My first time playing in Lagos. The last time I was here was in ’93. I left here at 13 years old.”

She added that her father was “too afraid” of her mum to bring her here because he feared if she comes here, she won’t want to go back to resume school.


#Newsworthy…

You were not awarded because you lack education – Model writes to Burna boy ..


Popular model, Naomi Campbell has written an open letter to the organizers of Grammy Awards after Burna Boy lost to Angelique Kidjo at the 2020 edition of the awards.


Naomi Campbell who praised Angelique for spreading light and opening minds through her music, stated that Burna Boy has not been given the accolades he truly deserves due to lack of education.

The supermodel averred that categorization of afrobeats in the ‘World Music’ category of the 2020 Grammys, diminished an entire genre in which such a high standard of talent has emerged.


Naomi who queried the recording academy on the voting pattern of the category, urged them to use the next 363 days to reassess and reflect on their perspective of ‘World Music.’

She wrote;

First, I want to say deepest congratulations to @angeliquekidjo for her award on Sunday, and thank you to you for spreading light and opening minds through your music… •


And to our AFRICAN GIANT, @burnaboygram… it is only due to lack of education that you have not been honored with the accolades you so truly deserve. You are always a winner in our hearts. ALWAYS. •

And to The @RecordingAcademy,
There is something that brings joy, strength and happiness to myself, and to so many people that hear it, and it is called Afrobeats. Afrobeats is a musical genre played on mainstream and primetime radio not only across the continent of Africa, but across the world… •


Recently, the genre was categorized into your ‘World Music’ category at the 2020 Grammys. This misrepresentation diminishes an entire genre in which such a high standard of talent has emerged; a genre that has been a force of hope and positivity for many, and a vehicle for artistry on the continent of Africa. •

Please take the next 363 days to reassess and reflect on your perspective of ‘World Music.’ Did the world get to vote for this award, or was it only the people in the United States a part of The Recording Academy? What will this neglectful categorization of music mean to individual cultures? Cultures who contribute their blood, sweat and tears, and every level of their creativity and work ethic into making music for YOU and for all of us. •

Please get up to speed on the state of all popular music today, and include Afrobeats Artist of the Year, Song of the Year, Album of the Year and all the subcategories that this genre so deserves – just as any other respected and recognized musical genre. •

This is bigger than you, so open your eyes, ears and minds and treat us right and with the respect we deserve.


#Newsworthy…

2020 Grammy: Cardi B stole the dress she wore from ..

…Mercy Eke


American rapper, Cardi B‘s outfit to the 2020 Grammy awards ceremony has made fans of Big Brother Naija 2019 winner, Mercy Eke restless.

The fans kept saying that the international rapper stole the design from the reality TV star.

This was fueled because the reality Tv star first rocked the outfit while in Dubai late last year and her fans feel the singer saw the outfit on her and decided to come up with something similar.


#Newsworthy…

2020 Grammy: Burna Boy called Angelique Kidjo, ‘Mama Africa’ ..

…In the end, it’s all love, respect and mutual support

…mourn Kobe and Gianna Bryant


On January 26, 2020, Nigerian superstar, Burna Boy lost the Grammy Award for Best World Music Album to Beninise legend, Angelique Kidjo and her critically-acclaimed album, Celia.

After a few hours of no social media activity by Burna Boy – who didn’t even post a picture of himself at the Grammy Awards – he has congratulated Angelique Kidjo on her win. A few hours ago, he took to his Twitter account to express his excitement at Angelique Kidjo’s win

He wrote that, “I love you forever @angeliquekidjo and every single person that rooted for me, I don’t take any of it lightly! The world get ready cause we’re all coming! #FOOTONNECK2020.” During a Breakfast Club interview on Power 105.1, New York, Burna Boy said that he personally sought out Angelique Kidjo for his Grammy-nominated album, African Giant.

https://www.instagram.com/burnaboygram/?utm_source=ig_embed&ig_mid=3DADAAD7-6E5B-4F70-A341-6CEAAEF76F47

In the same breath, the self-acclaimed ‘African Giant’ also commiserated with Kobe Bryant’s family. He wrote, “If I wasn’t doing music I would have played basketball, and it’s all because of Kobe! We’ve lost a legend and our hearts are breaking! Prayers up for his family #ripkobeandgianna.”

https://www.instagram.com/burnaboygram/?utm_source=ig_embed&ig_mid=3DADAAD7-6E5B-4F70-A341-6CEAAEF76F47

During her acceptance speech, Angelique Kidjo also gave Burna Boy a shout-out. In the end, it’s all love, respect and mutual support.

https://twitter.com/burnaboy/status/1221912185355423744


#Newsworthy…

2020 Grammy: Best dressed, Worse dressed celebrities ..


The 62nd edition of the Grammy Awards, an annual ceremony that recognises the best recordings, compositions, and artists in music globally held at the Staples Centre, Los Angeles on Sunday.

Billie Eilish, an 18-year-old American singer, made history by becoming the youngest artist to win the top four prizes.


She bagged the awards for the ‘Record of the Year’, ‘Album of the Year’, ‘Song of the Year’ and ‘Best New Artist’, for her ‘When We Sleep, Where Do We Go’ album. Here is the full list of winners.

Celebrities stepped out on the red carpet in their favourite designer wears, setting the tone for a glamorous event.


In a vibrant display of colours and styles, they dazzled and left fans and fashion enthusiasts with a lot to ponder about.

From the stunning to the outlandish, here are the best and worst dressed celebrities at the 2020 Grammy awards.

Best Dressed

Grammys
Joe Jonas and Sophie Turner

Grammys
John Legend and Chrissy Teigen

Grammys
Jameela Jamil

Grammys
Charlie Wilson

Grammys
Dua Lipa

g

Grammys
BTS

Grammys
Camila Cabello

Grammy
Ariana Grande

Grammy
Dreezy

Grammy
Usher

Grammy
Shawn Mendes

Grammy
Rosalia

Grammys
Maggie Rogers

Grammy
Priyanka Chopra and Joe Jonas

Worst Dressed

Grammys
Twigs

Grammys
Lana Del Rey

Grammys
James Blake

Grammys
Gwen Stefani

Grammy
Brandi Carlile

Grammy
Billy Porter

Grammy
Billie Eilish

Grammy
Bebe Rexha


#Newsworthy…

2020 Grammy: Michelle Obama wins big [Full winner list] ..


Billie Eilish, an 18-year-old US singer-cum-songwriter, earned the most awards at the 2020 Grammys with a total of five gramophone statuettes.

The 62nd Academy Awards held on Sunday, with Nigeria’s Burna Boy losing out to Angelique Kidjo, a Beninese vocalist, in the ‘Best World Album’ category.

Eilish had been nominated in six categories, including the ‘Record of the Year’, ‘Album of the Year’, ‘Song of the Year’ and ‘Best New Artist’, for her ‘When We Sleep, Where Do We Go’ album.


Finneas O’Connell, her brother-cum-producer, also won two Grammys while Paak Anderson, American rapper, and Lizzo, won two awards each.

Michelle Obama also snagged an award for the ‘Best Spoken Word Album’ on account of her audiobook for ‘Becoming’, a 2018 memoir.


Her win gives the Obama home its third Grammy award after Barack Obama, former US president, had already secured two Grammys in the same category for his books.

See all the winners below:


#Newsworthy…

2020 Grammy: Nigerians fully in support of Burna boy despite loss ..


Burna Boy has been dominating headlines since last weekend and although he did not win the coveted Grammy Award, he has won the hearts of many fans across Africa and indeed the world.

The Nigerian Singer had his compatriots solidly behind him prior to the awards night and he received more support even after the results were announced that he did not win.


Highlight of the evening was when the singer whom he lost to, Angelique Kidjo gave a powerful speech while dedicating the award to the ‘Ye’ crooner.

Nigerians have since trooped to social media to react to the turn of events and they’ve been pouring encomiums on Burna’s name.

See below ;

Tife wrote ;

So I decided to listen to few tracks from Angelique Kidjo’s Album & I must say Burna Boy is really an African Giant to be nominated alongside that woman.
Burna still gat more than enough time to put in more effort inorder to do better. He’s capable, he’s a winner too. #GRAMMYs


#Newsworthy…

2020 Grammy: I never hated Burna boy – AKA ..


Popular South African Rapper, AKA has reacted to the Grammy Award loss of Afrobeats singer Burna Boy.

The 62nd Grammy Awards which held last night in Los Angeles, California, saw Burna Boy lose to fellow African and legendary singer, Angelique Kidjo, with her album Ceila.


As soon as the news broke, trolls stormed AKA’s Twitter page to hear what he will say about the loss Burna Boy suffered.

Recall that Burna Boy and AKA went at each other over the xenophobic attacks inflicted on Nigerians by South Africans in their country.

With the Grammies over and Burna Boy going home, many expect AKA to express excitement.

However, he changed that narrative when he tweeted thus ;

“I never hated Burna Boy. All I did was stand up for my country. I think it’s time to move past this narrative. It’s tired. Like I said, even a nomination is a huge achievement”.

“What you should have done is focus on the positive instead of thinking about me and my country. In any case, Burna is still a champion. We still consider him a winner”.


#Newsworthy…

2020 Grammy: Billie Eilish awarded ‘best new artist’


The Latest on the Grammy Awards, being presented Sunday at Los Angeles’ Staples Center (all times local):

8:28 p.m.

Billie Eilish has won the Grammy for best new artist.

It was the third Grammy for the 18-year-old at Sunday’s ceremony at Staples Center in Los Angeles.

Earlier, she won song of the year for “Bad Guy” and best pop vocal album for “When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?”

“I feel like the fans deserve everything, they haven’t been talked about enough tonight,” Eilish said as she accepted the award. “I love all fandoms.”

She beat out a group of nominees that included Lil Nas X and Lizzo.

___

8:15 p.m.

With tears running down her cheeks, Demi Lovato stood on the Grammys stage in a white ballgown and belted her new single “Anyone,” written just four days before her near fatal overdose in July 2018.

It was the 27-year-old’s first time at the Grammy Awards in two years and her first big performance since that fateful day.

Accompanied by just a piano, Lovato glowed in the Christian Siriano gown on the stage Sunday at Staples Center in Los Angeles, stopping briefly after her voice faltered at the beginning and starting her emotional track once again. She made it through strongly, earning a standing ovation from her peers.

Before the Grammys, Lovato discussed the song with the New Music Daily with Zane Lowe on Apple Music’s Beats 1. She said she recorded “Anyone” before she was rushed from her home in the Hollywood Hills to a Los Angeles-area hospital. Paramedics found her unconscious.

She said before the Grammys that she’s excited for her comeback, including singing the national anthem at the Feb. 2 Super Bowl.

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7:55 p.m.

Sheila E. says FKA twigs made the decision to dance instead of sing alongside Usher during their Prince tribute at the Grammys.

Sheila E. said backstage Sunday that twigs chose against singing because she didn’t have the proper audio equipment for her to hear. She says Twigs decided to appear as a backup dancer, which drew initial criticism from some on social media.

Usher and Sheila E. performed a medley of Prince songs including “Little Red Corvette,” “When Doves Cry” and “Kiss.” Twigs appeared on stage during “When Doves Cry” in a feathery outfit, twirling on a pole before she danced on Usher.

Twigs is a British singer-songwriter who pole danced in her music video “Cellophane.”

___

7:45 p.m.

Billie Eilish has won the Grammy for song of the year for “Bad Guy.”

It was Eilish’s second Grammy Sunday, after winning best pop vocal album for “When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?” during the pre-telecast ceremony at Staples Center in Los Angeles.

Eilish said from the stage that “I feel like I joke around a lot, but I genuinely want to say that I’m so grateful.”

The 18-year-old told the music stars in the crowd that “I grew up watching all of you.”

She was joined on stage by her brother and musical partner Finneas, who won two Grammys for his work with his sister earlier Sunday.

___

7:40 p.m.

Meek Mill and DJ Khaled led a tribute to the late Nipsey Hussle at the Grammys.

“When we lost you it really put some pain on me,” Mill said in the somber solo rap that opened the tribute to his fellow rapper who was shot and killed 10 months ago at age 33.

Things got more celebratory when Khaled and John Legend appeared.

“Everybody get up out your seats, we’re doin’ this for Nipsey Hussle!” Khaled shouted to the crowd Sunday at Staples Center, as video of a rapping Hussle appeared on a big screen.

They were also joined by Kirk Franklin, Roddy Ricch and YG in paying homage to Hussle, who posthumously won his first Grammy in the pre-telecast ceremony earlier Sunday, taking best rap performance for “Racks in the Middle,” which features Ricch.

The Los Angeles native, whose real name was Ermias Joseph Asghedom, was gunned down outside his clothing store just a few miles from Staples Center on March 31. He had been nominated for a Grammy for the first time a few months earlier.

The tribute performance ended with Khaled shouting out the names of Hussle along with those of Kobe Bryant and Bryant’s daughter Gianna, who died in a helicopter crash earlier Sunday.

___

7:30 p.m.

The Grammy Awards have included plenty of sincere and explicit tributes to Kobe Bryant on the day of the NBA star’s death, but there were many more subtle ones too.

Billy Ray Cyrus’ guitar had “#24,” Bryant’s number, on his guitar and Lil Nas X had a Bryant jersey draped over a chair at the beginning of their performance of “Old Town Road” during the Grammys on Sunday at Staples Center in Los Angeles, the arena where Bryant played most of his career.

Run-DMC member Joseph “Run” Simmons” held up a white Bryant Jersey during their performance of “Walk This Way” with Aerosmith.

And Lizzo, who dedicated the show to Bryant when she opened it with a performance, accepted the Grammy for best pop solo performance without invoking his name. She simply said that today she realized that after being lost in her own problems all week, she realized that “in an instant all of that can go away.”

The 41-year-old Bryant, his 13-year-old daughter and seven others were killed in a helicopter crash just outside of Los Angeles earlier Sunday.

5:45 p.m.

Lizzo has won the Grammy for best pop solo performance for “Truth Hurts” in what is already shaping up to be a big night for the R&B singer-songwriter.

The award was the first handed out during Sunday’s Grammy Awards telecast from Staples Center in Los Angeles.

But Lizzo had already won two Grammys before the telecast. She won best traditional R&B performance for “Jerome” and best urban contemporary album for “Cuz I Love You (Deluxe)” Sunday at Staples Center in Los Angeles.

She accepted the third award minutes after opening the show with a medley of “Truth Hurts” and “Cuz I Love You,” a performance she started by dedicating the night to former NBA star Kobe Bryant, who died in a helicopter crash earlier Sunday.

“This whole week I’ve been lost in my problems, stressed out,” Lizzo said as she accepted her third award. “Then in an instant all of that can go away.”

___

This item has been corrected to show that Lizzo’s third Grammy was for best pop solo performance, instead of best solo pop vocal performance.

___

5:25 p.m.

Host Alicia Keys said the Grammys are steeped in “crazy sadness” coming just after the loss of Kobe Bryant.

“Earlier today, Los Angeles, America and the whole wide world lost a hero,” Keys said in her opening monologue.

She was then joined by members of Boyz II Men for an acapella rendition of their song “It’s So Hard To Say Goodbye to Yesterday.”

The 62nd annual Grammy Awards are being held Sunday in Los Angeles at Staples Center, the arena where the Lakers legend and former NBA superstar played nearly all of his 20-year career. And the ceremony comes on the day when the 41-year-old Bryant died in a helicopter crash.

“We’re standing here in the house that Kobe Bryant built,” Keys said.

Lizzo had opened the show by saying “Tonight is for Kobe” at the beginning of her performance of “Cuz I Love You.”

___

5:10 p.m.

Lizzo has opened the Grammys telecast with a tribute to Kobe Bryant.

“Tonight is for Kobe,” the R&B singer-songwriter declared as she conducted an orchestra and launched into her song “Cuz I Love You” at the start of the show.

The 62nd annual Grammy Awards are being held Sunday in Los Angeles at Staples Center, the arena where the Lakers legend and former NBA superstar played nearly all of his 20-year career. And the ceremony comes on the day when the 41-year-old Bryant, his 13-year-old daughter and seven others died in a helicopter crash just outside the city.

Lizzo, who won two Grammys before the telecast started, and Billie Eilish are among those up for the biggest awards at the ceremony hosted by Alicia Keys.

4 p.m.

Lizzo and Billie Eilish have won their first career Grammys in what could be the beginning of a big night for both of the pop sensations.

Lizzo won best traditional R&B performance for “Jerome” and best urban contemporary album for “Cuz I Love You (Deluxe)” during the Grammy Awards pre-telecast ceremony Sunday at Staples Center in Los Angeles.

The 18-year-old Eilish won best pop vocal album for “When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?” and her brother and musical partner Finneas won best engineered album and producer of the year.

Lizzo and Eilish are among those nominated for the night’s biggest awards, including best new artist and album, song and record of the year, to be presented during the Grammys telecast that begins at 8 p.m. Eastern on CBS.

2:50

The late Nipsey Hussle has won his first Grammy Award.

Hussle won best rap performance Sunday for “Racks in the Middle,” which also features Roddy Ricch and Hit-Boy.

Lauren London, Hussle’s partner and the mother of his child, accepted the award with several members of Hussle’s family.

London called Hussle “a phenomenal vessel” who “did it not just for the awards, but for the people.”

The Los Angeles rapper whose real name was Ermias Joseph Asghedom, got his first Grammy nomination last year.

Less than two months later, he was shot and killed at age 33 as he stood outside his clothing store.

The award comes on a day when Los Angeles is mourning another local hero, former NBA star Kobe Bryant, who died in a helicopter crash Sunday at age 41.

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2:40

At age 61, Tanya Tucker has won the first two Grammy Awards of her career, 48 years after her first hit at age 13.

Tucker won best country album Sunday during the pre-telecast ceremony at Staples Center in Los Angeles for “While I’m Livin’,” her first album of original material in 17 years.

She also won best country song for “Bring My Flowers Now,” which is also nominated for overall song of the year, to be presented during the main telecast later Sunday.

Tucker was a 13-year-old country child prodigy when her 1972 song “Delta Dawn” became a huge hit.

Her recordings became increasingly sparse through the years as she went through career and personal struggles, and last year’s “While I’m Livin’” represented the biggest of several comeback attempts.

Tucker has been nominated for Grammys 14 times.

Tucker is still very young compared to the winner of the other major country Grammy, 86-year-old Willie Nelson, who took home best country solo performance for “Ride Me Back Home.” It was Nelson’s ninth Grammy.

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2:15

Hildur Guðnadóttir is taking home a Grammy for music she first thought no one would care to hear.

The female composer won best score soundtrack for the HBO miniseries “Chernobyl” during the pre-telecast ceremony Sunday.

The soundtrack already won her an Emmy late last year. And in January she became the first woman in 19 years to win best original score for “Joker” at the Golden Globes.

“I think it fit really well with the images of the film, and I was happy with how the music worked with the narrative and characters in this series,” she said backstage of the “Chernobyl” soundtrack. “But I never thought anyone would ever listen to the soundtrack record, honestly. I’ve very surprised to be here today.”

She is also up next month for an Academy Award for “Joker.” If she wins an Oscar, she could have three of the four EGOT awards, after her Grammy and Emmy.

Guðnadóttir called the experience “surreal” and an “adventure.” She said she might have plans to go on Broadway, which could present some pressure for her to win a Tony Award.

“Now, I feel a lot of pressure,” she said with a chuckle. “That’ll be the next step. The next project, I guess.”

— Jonathan Landrum Jr.

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1:45 p.m.

Michelle Obama is a Grammy winner.

The former first lady won her first Grammy Award on Sunday for best spoken word album for the audio book of her 2019 memoir “Becoming.”

Obama was not on hand to accept the award handed out at the Staples Center in Los Angeles during the Grammys pre-telecast ceremony.

Her husband, former president Barack Obama, has two Grammys in the same category, one for his 2005 audio book “Dreams of My Father” and another for his 2007 audio book “The Audacity of Hope.”

The spoken word album category includes poetry, storytelling and audio books.

___

1:15 p.m.

Beyoncé’s “Homecoming” has won the Grammy Award for best music film.

The Netflix film weaves together Beyoncé’s 2018 performances at the Coachella music festival, which included numerous nods to historically black colleges and universities.

Producer Steve Pamon in accepting the award said those working to graduate from the institutions are their inspiration. He also praised Beyoncé for her leadership on the project.

The superstar did not attend the pre-telecast ceremony where her Grammy win was announced.

___

12:45 p.m.

The Grammy Awards pre-telecast ceremony opened with a moment of silence for Kobe Bryant.

Interim Recording Academy CEO Harvey Mason Jr. opened the ceremony where dozens of Grammys are handed out before the main show, telling attendees, “As most of you may know, we lost Kobe Bryant in a tragic helicopter accident today.”

“Since we are in his house, I would ask you to join me in a moment of silence,” Mason said.

Artists arriving at the show reacted to Bryant’s death and his influence.

Blues artist and Grammys nominee Keb’ Mo’ called Bryant’s death “a huge loss.”

“He’s just a huge role model,” Keb’ Mo’ said.

British artist Labrinth said: “It was insane news to hear this morning. He’s been part of my life for a very long time. … I couldn’t believe it.”

___

10 a.m.

Lizzo, Billie Eilish and Lil Nas X are walking into what should be one of the most exciting days of their careers as they attend their first-ever Grammy Awards on Sunday, where they are the top-nominated acts. But 10 days before arguably the biggest night in music, the industry erupted when the Recording Academy announced it had put its recently hired CEO, Deborah Dugan, on administrative leave for misconduct.

Dugan and her lawyers fired back at the academy, claiming that the awards show is rigged. That energy puts a dark cloud over nominees like Lizzo, Eilish and Lil Nas X, breakthrough acts who are competing for top prizes.

The Grammy Awards are being presented Sunday at the Staples Center in Los Angeles. The main telecast begins at 8 p.m. Eastern on CBS.


#Newsworthy…

2020 Grammy: Wizkid, Davido, Don Jazzy celebrate Burna Boy (see their tweets)..


Burna Boy has done the entire country proud at the Grammys, despite narrowly missing out to Angelique Kidjo on the honour.

After several worthy nominations of Nigerian musicians and expressions of ambition to one day win the gramophone by plenty others, Burna Boy almost achieved the unthinkable. He was in a strong position to be the first homegrown Nigerian to bring the Grammy home at the 62nd edition of the award ceremony.

On the night of the ceremony which was held at the Staples Center, Los Angeles, the entire country stayed up at midnight, rooting for the Nigerian music superstar to become the first homegrown singer to win the highly coveted award. And he nearly did it in style, as he competed for the honour against three-time Grammy winner Angelique Kidjo, as well as Altin Gün, Nathalie Joachim With Spektral Quartet, Bokanté And Metropole Orkest Conducted By Jules Buckley, in the World Music Category.


Burna Boy’s rise to glory had started from his Burn mixtape days, leading to the release of ‘African Giant’, a critically acclaimed album which nearly earned him the ultimate prize. But he respectably lost to music veteran Angelique Kidjo on the night, leaving the hearts of millions of his fans in Nigeria and worldwide, shattered.

His colleagues, many of whom had been touted to be the first to bring the coveted award home, have commended him on a good showing, saying how proud they are and offering words of encouragement.


Davido, sent his early congratulatory message to Burna, saying: “Congrats in advance fam !!!! Big weekend for you ! It’s already yours in Jesus name.“


Don Jazzy had also offered words of support in a series of tweets, writing on his Twitter before the ceremony: “Grammy should better not be unfortunate today.”


Wizkid, who himself has gone close to achieving the honour through his collaboration with Drake, has had this to say in support of Burna shortly before the ceremony “King Burna! Bring it home!”


It has taken Burna Boy four albums, two mixtapes, one EP and several singles – to nearly achieve this feat. His first mixtape, Burn Notice, was released in 2011 but it was his 2018 hit single, ‘Ye’ from his third studio album, ‘Outside’ that exposed him to a global audience.

This loss comes after a very impressive year of winnings for Burna Boy in 2019, in which he won a BET Award for ‘Best International Act’ and ‘MTV: EMA awards for ‘Best African Act.


Juju maestro, King Sunny Ade (1984 & 1999); Afrobeat king, Femi Kuti (2002, 2009, 2011 & 2013) and Seun Kuti (2019) have also all previously gone agonisingly close to winning the Grammy award.

As the accolades deservedly pour in for Burna Boy, he and his peers will relish the chance to work harder towards achieving the honour, knowing fully well that it is indeed, doable.


#Newsworthy…

2020 Grammy: See how Teni, Simi, Tiwa, Others reacts to Burna Boy’s loss..


For the first time in a while, the country was truly united to support Burna Boy for his impressive showing at the Grammy Awards last night.

While he didn’t win his first Grammy for his ‘African Giant’ album on Sunday, January 26 at the Staples Center, Los Angeles, Angelique Kidjo who won in Burna’s category dedicated her award to him.


As we celebrate the nomination and Burna Boy for making it thus far and representing the continent, different Nigerians and celebrities have taken to social media to send celebratory messages to Burna Boy.

Tiwa Savage and Yemi Alade, who also received Grammy credits for their work on Lion King: The Gift took to social media to shower praises on Burna.


Yemi Alade said, “I STAN A QUEEN… Congratulations #MAMAAFRICA, @angeliquekidjo 🏆🏆🏆, congratulations @burnaboy, congratulations #AFRICA OUR TIME IS NOW.”

Teni Makanaki had joined in singing praises of Burna when the nomination list was announced, describing it as “a special moment for every African!” She had gone on to express her confidence that he’d bag the award. “You will win,” she wrote on her Twitter.

Simi had also rooted for the singer ahead of the awards ceremony. “Burna better win,” she said.

Congratulations are in order to the king of afro-fusion and we can’t wait to see what big things he does next.


#Newsworthy…

Check out some of Bryant’s Grammy honors you might have miss..


The Grammy Awards have included plenty of sincere and big tributes to Kobe Bryant on the day of the NBA star’s death, but there were many more subtle ones too.

Billy Ray Cyrus’ guitar had “#24,” Bryant’s number, on his guitar and Lil Nas X had a Bryant jersey draped over a chair at the beginning of their performance of “Old Town Road” during the Grammys on Sunday at Staples Center in Los Angeles, the arena where Bryant played most of his career.

Run-DMC member Joseph “Run” Simmons” held up a white Bryant Jersey during their performance of “Walk This Way” with Aerosmith.

And Lizzo, who dedicated the show to Bryant when she opened it with a performance, accepted the Grammy for best pop solo performance without invoking his name. She simply said that today she realized that after being lost in her own problems all week, she realized that “in an instant all of that can go away.”

Throughout the evening, the Los Angeles Lakers jerseys belonging to Bryant were illuminated as they hung inside the Staples Center.

A tribute to the late Nipsey Hussle also included tribute to Bryant. The tribute performance ended with DJ Khaled shouting out the names of Hussle along with those of Kobe Bryant and Bryant’s daughter Gianna.

Alicia Keys and Boyz II Men had everyone in tears right at the start of the Grammys with their tribute to Kobe Bryant.

The 41-year-old Bryant, his 13-year-old daughter and seven others were killed in a helicopter crash just outside of Los Angeles earlier Sunday.


#Newsworthy…

#NobleSport

2020 Grammy: Eilish, Lizzo shines (See full list of winners)


Pop iconoclast Billie Eilish was the runaway winner at 62nd Grammys on Sunday, winning five awards, as the music world mourned the loss of LA’s hometown basketball hero Kobe Bryant with a series of emotional tributes.

Eilish, 18, swept the “big four” prizes — Album of the Year, Song of the Year, Record of the Year and Best New Artist — in an industry acknowledgement of her wave-making role as the new reference point for pop’s future.

“What’s next? I don’t know — be in this moment is all I’m thinking about,” Eilish told reporters backstage.

Lizzo — one of her main competitors, who won three awards — kicked off the glitzy gala at the Staples Center by dedicating it to Bryant, in the very arena where the NBA icon made history with the Los Angeles Lakers.

Lizzo: wins three awards

“Tonight is for Kobe,” shouted the 31-year-old twerking flautist, hours after his death in a helicopter crash was confirmed. His 13-year-old daughter and seven others also died in the incident.

Lizzo then launched into an eye-popping medley performance of her top hits that set the tone for the night.

She handed over to host Alicia Keys, who offered another love letter to Bryant’s memory: “We’re all feeling crazy sadness right now. Earlier today, Los Angeles, America and the whole wide world lost a hero.”

“And we’re literally standing here heartbroken in the house that Kobe Bryant built,” said Keys, before launching into a soulful rendition of “It’s So Hard to Say Goodbye (To Yesterday)” with the group Boyz II Men.

“He would want us to keep the vibrations high,” Keys later said, before singing a humorous yet soothing opening monologue at the piano.

A mushrooming crowd of people, many of them in tears, gathered near the arena to mourn the 41-year-old Bryant. Flags were flying at half-mast.

But the show went on, with an understated performance from Eilish who thanked her fans — and fellow nominee Ariana Grande — in accepting her haul of trophies.

“Mainly I think the fans deserve everything,” she said, standing alongside her brother Finneas O’Connell, who shared in her Grammy glory while also winning his own producing and engineering awards.

“I feel like they have not been talked about enough tonight because they’re the only reason any of us are here at all. So thanks to the fans.”

And she gave a shoutout to Grande, who despite five nominations went home empty-handed, saying that Grande’s “thank u, next,” had been a lifesaver for her.

“I think it deserves more than anything in the world, I love you so much,” Eilish said.

Lil Nas X took home two Grammys for his pop culture phenomenon “Old Town Road,” while Lizzo won three out of her eight nominations.

“This whole week, I’d be lost in my problems, stressed out — and then in an instant all of that can go away and your priorities really shift,” the 31-year-old superstar said, alluding to Bryant’s death.

“Let’s continue to reach out, hold each other down and lift each other up.”

The veterans were not shut out — Lady Gaga won two Grammys for her soundtrack for the hit film “A Star Is Born,” and one went to Beyonce, who nabbed the prize for best music film for “Homecoming.”

Angelique Kidjo took home the award for Best World Album.

All the 62nd Grammy winners:

Record of the Year:

“Hey, Ma” — Bon Iver
“Bad Guy” — Billie Eilish (WINNER)
“7 Rings” — Ariana Grande
“Hard Place” — H.E.R.
“Talk” — Khalid
“Old Town Road” — Lil Nas X Featuring Billy Ray Cyrus
“Truth Hurts” — Lizzo
“Sunflower” — Post Malone & Swae Lee

Album of the Year:

“I, I” — Bon Iver
“Norman F—ing Rockwell!” — Lana Del Rey
“When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?” — Billie Eilish (WINNER)
“Thank U, Next” — Ariana Grande
“I Used To Know Her” — H.E.R.
“7” — Lil Nas X
“Cuz I Love You” (Deluxe) — Lizzo
“Father of the Bride” — Vampire Weekend

Best New Artist:

Black Pumas
Billie Eilish (WINNER)
Lil Nas X
Lizzo
Maggie Rogers
Rosalía
Tank and the Bangas
Yola

Best Rap/Sung Performance:

“Higher” — DJ Khaled ft. Nipsey Hussle & John Legend (WINNER)
“Drip Too Hard” — Lil Baby & Gunna
“Panini” — Lil Nas X
“Ballin” — Mustard ft. Roddy Ricch
“The London” — Young Thug ft. J. Cole & Travis Scott

Song of the Year:

“Always Remember Us This Way” — Natalie Hemby, Lady Gaga, Hillary Lindsey & Lori McKenna, songwriters (Lady Gaga)
“Bad Guy” — Billie Eilish O’Connell & Finneas O’Connell, songwriters (Billie Eilish) (WINNER)
“Bring My Flowers Now” — Brandi Carlile, Phil Hanseroth, Tim Hanseroth & Tanya Tucker, songwriters (Tanya Tucker)
“Hard Place” — Ruby Amanfu, Sam Ashworth, D. Arcelious Harris. H.E.R. & Rodney Jerkins, songwriters (H.E.R.)
“Lover” — Taylor Swift, songwriter (Taylor Swift)
“Norman F—ing Rockwell” — Jack Antonoff & Lana Del Rey, songwriters (Lana Del Rey)
“Someone You Loved” — Tom Barnes, Lewis Capaldi, Pere Kelleher, Benjamin Kohn & Sam Roman, songwriters (Lewis Capaldi)
“Truth Hurts” — Steven Cheung, Eric Frederic, Melissa Jefferson & Jesse Saint John, songwriters (Lizzo)

Best Rap Album:

Revenge Of The Dreamers III — Dreamville
Championships — Meek Mill
i am > i was — 21 Savage
IGOR — Tyler, The Creator (WINNER)
The Lost Boy — YBN Cordae

Best Comedy Album:

Quality Time — Jim Gaffigan
Relatable — Ellen Degeneres
Right Now — Aziz Ansari
Son Of Patricia — Trevor Noah
Sticks & Stones — Dave Chappelle (WINNER)

Best Country Duo/Group Performance:

“Brand New Man” — Brooks & Dunn with Luke Combs
“I Don’t Remember Me (Before You)” — Brothers Osborne
“Speechless” — Dan & Shay (WINNER)
“The Daughters” — Little Big Town
“Common” — Maren Morris ft. Brandi Carlile

Best Pop Solo Performance:

“Spirit” — Beyoncé
“Bad Guy” — Billie Eilish
“7 Rings” — Ariana Grande
“Truth Hurts” — Lizzo (WINNER)
“You Need To Calm Down” — Taylor Swift

POP FIELD

Best Pop Duo/Group Performance:

“Old Town Road” — Lil Nas X & Billy Ray Cyrus (WINNER)
“Boyfriend” — Ariana Grande & Social House
“Sucker” — Jonas Brothers
“Señorita” — Shawn Mendes & Camila Cabello

Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album:

Look Now — Elvis Costello & The Imposters (WINNER)
Sì — Andrea Bocelli
Love (Deluxe Edition) — Michael Bublé
A Legendary Christmas — John Legend
Walls — Barbra Streisand

Best Pop Vocal Album:

When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go — Billie Eilish (WINNER)
The Lion King: The Gift — Beyoncé
Thank U, Next — Ariana Grande
No. 6 Collaborations Project — Ed Sheeran
Lover — Taylor Swift

DANCE/ELECTRONIC FIELD

Best Dance Recording:

“Got To Keep On” — The Chemical Brothers (WINNER)
“Linked” — Bonobo
“Piece Of Your Heart” — Meduza & Goodboys
“Underwater” — Rüfüs Du Sol
“Midnight Hour” — Skrillex & Boys Noize With Ty Dolla $ign

Best Dance/Electronic Album:

No Geography — The Chemical Brothers (WINNER)
LP5 — Apparat
Hi This Is Flume (Mixtape) — Flume
Solace — Rüfüs Du Sol
Weather — Tycho

CONTEMPORARY INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC

Best Contemporary Instrumental Album:

Mettavolution — Rodrigo y Gabriela (WINNER)
Ancestral Recall — Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah
Star People Nation — Theo Croker
Beat Music! Beat Music! Beat Music! — Mark Guiliana
Elevate — Lettuce

ROCK

Best Rock Performance:

“This Land” — Gary Clark Jr. (WINNER)
“Pretty Waste” — Bones UK
“History Repeats” — Brittany Howard
“Woman” — Karen O & Danger Mouse
“Too Bad” — Rival Sons

Best Metal Performance:

“7empest” — Tool (WINNER)
“Astorolus – The Great Octopus” — Candlemass ft. Tony Iommi
“Humanicide” — Death Angel
“Bow Down” — I Prevail
“Unleashed” — Killswitch Engage

Best Rock Song:

“This Land” — Gary Clark Jr., Songwriter (Gary Clark Jr.) (WINNER)
“Fear Inoculum” — Danny Carey, Justin Chancellor, Adam Jones & Maynard James Keenan, Songwriters (Tool)
“Give Yourself A Try” — George Daniel, Adam Hann, Matthew Healy & Ross Macdonald, Songwriters (The 1975)
“Harmony Hall” — Ezra Koenig, Songwriter (Vampire Weekend)
“History Repeats” — Brittany Howard, Songwriter (Brittany Howard)

Best Rock Album:

Social Cues — Cage The Elephant (WINNER)
Amo — Bring Me The Horizon
In The End — The Cranberries
Trauma — I Prevail
Feral Roots — Rival Sons

ALTERNATIVE

Best Alternative Music Album:

Father of the Bride — Vampire Weekend (WINNER)
U.F.O.F. — Big Thief
Assume Form — James Blake
i,i — Bon Iver
Anima — Thom Yorke

R&B

Best R&B Performance:

“Come Home” — Anderson .Paak & André 300 (WINNER)
“Love Again” — Daniel Caesar & Brandy
“Could’ve Been” — H.E.R. & Bryson Tiller
“Exactly How I Feel” — Lizzo & Gucci Mane
“Roll Some Mo” — Lucky Daye

Best Traditional R&B Performance:

“Jerome” — Lizzo (WINNER)
“Time Today” — BJ The Chicago Kid
“Steady Love” — India.Arie
“Real Games” — Lucky Daye
“Built For Love” — PJ Morton & Jazmine Sullivan

Best R&B Song:

“Say So” — Pj Morton, Songwriter (Pj Morton Ft. Jojo) (WINNER)
“Could’ve Been” — Dernst Emile Ii, David “Swagg R’celious” Harris, H.E.R. & Hue “Soundzfire” Strother, Songwriters (H.E.R. Ft. Bryson Tiller)
“Look At Me Now” — Emily King & Jeremy Most, Songwriters (Emily King)
“No Guidance” — Chris Brown, Tyler James Bryant, Nija Charles, Aubrey Graham, Anderson Hernandez, Michee Patrick Lebrun, Joshua Lewis, Noah Shebib & Teddy Walton, Songwriters (Chris Brown Ft. Drake)
“Roll Some Mo” — David Brown, Dernst Emile Ii & Peter Lee Johnson, Songwriters (Lucky Daye)

Best Urban Contemporary Album:

Cuz I Love You (Deluxe) — Lizzo (WINNER)
Apollo XXI — Steve Lacy
Overload — Georgia Anne Muldrow
Saturn — Nao
Being Human In Public — Jessie Reyez

Best R&B Album:

Venture — Anderson .Paak
1123 — BJ The Chicago Kid
Painted — Lucky Daye
Ella Mai — Ella Mai
Paul — PJ Morton

RAP

Best Rap Performance:

“Racks In The Middle” — Nipsey Hussle ft. Roddy Ricch & Hit-boy (WINNER)
“Middle Child” — J.Cole
“Suge” — DaBaby
“Down Bad” — Dreamville ft. J.I.D, Bas, J. Cole, Earthgang & Young Nudy
“Clout” — Offset ft. Cardi B

Best Rap Song:

“A Lot” — Jermaine Cole, Dacoury Natche, 21 Savage & Anthony White, songwriters (21 Savage ft. J. Cole) (WINNER)
“Bad Idea” — Chancelor Bennett, Cordae Dunston, Uforo Ebong & Daniel Hackett, songwriters (Ybn Cordae ft. Chance The Rapper)
“Gold Roses” — Noel Cadastre, Aubrey Graham, Anderson Hernandez, Khristopher Riddick-tynes, William Leonard Roberts Ii, Joshua Quinton Scruggs, Leon Thomas Iii & Ozan Yildirim, songwriters (Rick Ross ft. Drake)
“Racks In The Middle” — Ermias Asghedom, Dustin James Corbett, Greg Allen Davis, Chauncey Hollis, Jr. & Rodrick Moore, songwriters (Nipsey Hussle ft. Roddy Ricch & Hit-boy)
“Suge” — Dababy, Jetsonmade & Pooh Beatz, songwriters (Dababy)

COUNTRY

Best Country Solo Performance:

“Ride Me Back Home” — Willie Nelson (WINNER)
“All Your’n” — Tyler Childers
“Girl Goin’ Nowhere” — Ashley McBryde
“God’s Country” — Blake Shelton
“Bring My Flowers Now” — Tanya Tucker

Best Country Song:

“Bring My Flowers Now” — Brandi Carlile, Phil Hanseroth, Tim Hanseroth & Tanya Tucker, Songwriters (Tanya Tucker) (WINNER)
“Girl Goin’ Nowhere” — Jeremy Bussey & Ashley Mcbryde, Songwriters (Ashley Mcbryde)
“It All Comes Out In The Wash” — Miranda Lambert, Hillary Lindsey, Lori Mckenna & Liz Rose, Songwriters (Miranda Lambert)
“Some Of It” — Eric Church, Clint Daniels, Jeff Hyde & Bobby Pinson, Songwriters (Eric Church)
“Speechless” — Shay Mooney, Jordan Reynolds, Dan Smyers & Laura Veltz, Songwriters (Dan + Shay)

Best Country Album:

While I’m Livin’ — Tanya Tucker (WINNER)
Desperate Man — Eric Church
Stronger Than The Truth — Reba McEntire
Interstate Gospel — Pistol Annies
Center Point Road — Thomas Rhett

NEW AGE

Best New Age Album:

Wings — Peter Kater (WINNER)
Fairy Dreams — David Arkenstone
Homage To Kindness — David Darling
Verve — Sebastian Plano
Deva — Deva Premal

JAZZ

Best Improvised Jazz Solo:

“Sozinho” — Randy Brecker, soloist (WINNER)
“Elsewhere” — Melissa Aldana, soloist
“Tomorrow Is The Question” — Julian Lage, soloist
“The Windup” — Brandford Marsalis, soloist
“Sightseeing” — Christian McBride, soloist

Best Jazz Vocal Album:

12 Little Spells — Esperanza Spalding (WINNER)
Thirsty Ghost — Sara Gazarek
Love & Liberation — Jazzmeia Horn
Alone Together — Catherine Russell
Screenplay — The Tierney Sutton Band

Best Jazz Instrumental Album:

Finding Gabriel — Brad Mehldau (WINNER)
In The Key Of The Universe — Joey DeFrancesco
The Secret Between The Shadow And The Soul — Branford Marsalis Quartet
Christian McBride’s New Jawn — Brad Mehldau
Come What May – Joshua Redman Quartet

Best Jazz Ensemble Album:

The Omni-american Book Club — Brian Lynch Big Band (WINNER)
Triple Helix — Anat Cohen Tentet
Dancer In Nowhere — Miho Hazama
Hiding Out — Mike Holober & The Gotham Jazz Orchestra
One Day Wonder — Terraza Big Band

Best Latin Jazz Album:

Antidote — Chick Corea & The Spanish Heart Band (WINNER)
Sorte!: Music By John Finbury — Thalma De Freitas With Vitor Gonçalves, John Patitucci, Chico Pinheiro, Rogerio Boccato & Duduka Da Fonseca
Una Noche Con Rubén Blades — Jazz At Lincoln Center Orchestra With Wynton Marsalis & Rubén Blades
Carib — David Sánchez
Sonero: The Music Of Ismael Rivera — Miguel Zenón

GOSPEL/CONTEMPORARY CHRISTIAN MUSIC

Best Gospel Performance/Song:

“Love Theory”– Kirk Franklin; Kirk Franklin, Songwriter (WINNER)
“Talkin’ ‘Bout Jesus” — Gloria Gaynor ft. Yolanda Adams; Bryan Fowler, Gloria Gaynor & Chris Stevens, Songwriters
“See The Light” — Travis Greene ft. Jekalyn Carr
“Speak The Name” — Koryn Hawthorne ft. Natalie Grant
“This Is A Move (Live)” — Tasha Cobbs Leonard; Tony Brown, Brandon Lake, Tasha Cobbs Leonard & Nate Moore, Songwriters

Best Contemporary Christian Music Performance/Song
:

“God Only Knows” — for King & Country & Dolly Parton; Josh Kerr, Jordan Reynolds, Joel Smallbone, Luke Smallbone & Tedd Tjornhom, songwriters (WINNER)
“Only Jesus” — Casting Crowns; Mark Hall, Bernie Herms & Matthew West, songwriters
“Haven’t Seen It Yet” — Danny Gokey; Danny Gokey, Ethan Hulse & Colby Wedgeworth, songwriters
“God’s Not Done With You (Single Version)” — Tauren Wells
“Rescue Story” — Zach Williams; Ethan Hulse, Andrew Ripp, Jonathan Smith & Zach Williams, songwriters

Best Gospel Album:

Long Live Love — Kirk Franklin (WINNER)
Goshen — Donald Lawrence Presents The Tri-City Singers
Tunnel Vision — Gene Moore
Settle Here — William Murphy
Something’s Happening! A Christmas Album — CeCe Winans

Best Contemporary Christian Music Album:

Burn The Ships — for King & Country (WINNER)
I Know A Ghost — Crowder
Haven’t Seen It Yet — Danny Gokey
The Elements — TobyMac
Holy Roar — Chris Tomlin

Best Roots Gospel Album:

Testimony — Gloria Gaynor (WINNER)
Deeper Roots: Where The Bluegrass
Grows — Steven Curtis Chapman
Deeper Oceans — Joseph Habedank
His Name Is Jesus — Tim Menzies
Gonna Sing, Gonna Shout (Various Artists) — Jerry Salley, producer

LATIN

Best Latin Pop Album:

#ELDISCO — Alejandro Sanz (WINNER)
Vida — Luis Fonsi
11:11 — Maluma
Montaner — Ricardo Montaner
Fantasía — Sebastian Yatra

Best Latin Rock, Urban or Alternative Album:

El Mal Querer – Rosalía (WINNER)
X 100PRE — Bad Bunny
Oasis — J Balvin & Bad Bunny
Indestructible — Flor De Toloache
Almadura — iLe

Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano):

De Ayer Para Siempre — Mariachi Los Camperos (WINNER)
Caminando — Joss Favela
Percepción — Intocable
Poco A Poco — La Energia Norteña
20 Aniversario — Mariachi Divas De Cindy Shea

Best Tropical Latin Album:

Opus — Marc Anthony (WINNER – TIE)
A Journey Through Cuban Music — Aymée Nuviola (WINNER – TIE)
Tiempo Al Tiempo — Luis Enrique + C4 Trio
Candela — Vicente García
Literal — Juan Luis Guerra 4.40

AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC

Best American Roots Performance:

“Saint Honesty” — Sara Bareilles (WINNER)
“Call My Name” — I’m With Her
“Father Mountain” — Calexico With Iron & Wine
“I’m On My Way” — Rhiannon Giddens With Francesco Turrisi
“Faraway Look” — Yola

Best American Roots Song:

“Call My Name” — Sarah Jarosz, Aoife O’donovan & Sara Watkins, songwriters (I’m With Her) (WINNER)
“Black Myself” — Amythyst Kiah, songwriter (Our Native Daughters)
“Crossing To Jerusalem” — Rosanne Cash & John Leventhal, songwriters (Rosanne Cash)
“Faraway Look” — Dan Auerbach, Yola Carter & Pat Mclaughlin, songwriters (Yola)
“I Don’t Wanna Ride The Rails No More” — Vince Gill, songwriter (Vince Gill)

Best Americana Album:

Oklahoma — Keb’ Mo’ (WINNER)
Years To Burn — Calexico And Iron & Wine
Who Are You Now — Madison Cunningham
Tales Of America — J.S. Ondara
Walk Through Fire — Yola

Best Bluegrass Album:

Tall Fiddler — Michael Cleveland (WINNER)
Live In Prague, Czech Republic — Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver
Toil, Tears & Trouble — The Po’ Ramblin’ Boys
Royal Traveller — Missy Raines
If You Can’t Stand The Heat — Frank Solivan & Dirty Kitchen

Best Traditional Blues Album:

Tall, Dark & Handsome — Delbert McClinton & Self-made Men (WINNER)
Kingfish — Christone “Kingfish” Ingram
Sitting On Top Of The Blues — Bobby Rush
Baby, Please Come Home — Jimmie Vaughan
Spectacular Class — Jontavious Willis

Best Contemporary Blues Album:

This Land — Gary Clark Jr. (WINNER)
Venom & Faith — Larkin Poe
Brighter Days — Robert Randolph & The Family Band
Somebody Save Me — Sugaray Rayford
Keep On — Southern Avenue

Best Folk Album:

Patty Griffin — Patty Griffin (WINNER)
My Finest Work Yet — Andrew Bird
Rearrange My Heart — Che Apalache
Evening Machines — Gregory Alan Isakov
Front Porch — Joy Williams

Best Regional Roots Music Album:

Good Time — Ranky Tanky (WINNER)
Kalawai’anui — Amy Hānaiali’i
When It’s Cold – Cree Round Dance Songs — Northern Cree
Recorded Live At The 2019 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival — Rebirth Brass Band
Hawaiian Lullaby (Various Artists) — Imua Garza & Kimié Miner, Producers

REGGAE

Best Reggae Album:

Rapture — Koffee (WINNER)
As I Am — Julian Marley
The Final Battle: Sly & Robbie Vs. Roots Radics — Sly & Robbie & Roots Radics
Mass Manipulation — Steel Pulse
More Work To Be Done — Third World

WORLD MUSIC

Best World Music Album:

Celia — Angelique Kidjo (WINNER)
Gece — Altin Gün
What Heat — Bokanté & Metropole Orkest Conducted By Jules Buckley
African Giant — Burna Boy
Fanm D’ayiti — Nathalie Joachim With Spektral Quartet

CHILDREN’S

Best Children’s Music Album:

Ageless Songs For The Child Archetype — Jon Samson (WINNER)
Flying High! — Caspar Babypants
I Love Rainy Days — Daniel Tashian
The Love — Alphabet Rockers
Winterland — The Okee Dokee Brothers

SPOKEN WORD

Best Spoken Word Album (Includes Poetry, Audio Books & Storytelling):

Becoming — Michelle Obama (WINNER)
Beastie Boys Book (Various Artists) — Michael Diamond, Adam Horovitz, Scott Sherratt & Dan Zitt, producers
I.V. Catatonia: 20 Years As A Two-Time Cancer Survivor — Eric Alexandrakis
Mr. Know-It-All — John Waters
Sekou Andrews & The String Theory — Sekou Andrews & The String Theory

MUSICAL THEATER

Best Musical Theater Album:

Hadestown — Reeve Carney, André De Shields, Amber Gray, Eva Noblezada & Patrick Page, principal soloists; Mara Isaacs, David Lai, Anaïs Mitchell & Todd Sickafoose, producers (Anaïs Mitchell, composer & lyricist) (Original Broadway Cast) (WINNER)
Ain’t Too Proud: The Life And Times Of The Temptations — Saint Aubyn, Derrick Baskin, James Harkness, Jawan M. Jackson, Jeremy Pope & Ephraim Sykes, principal soloists; Scott M. Riesett, producer (Original Broadway Cast)
Moulin Rouge! The Musical — Danny Burstein, Tam Mutu, Sahr Ngaujah, Karen Olivo & Aaron Tveit, principal soloists; Justin Levine, Baz Luhrmann, Matt Stine & Alex Timbers, producers (Original Broadway Cast)
The Music Of Harry Potter And The Cursed Child – In Four Contemporary Suites — Imogen Heap, producer; Imogen Heap, composer (Imogen Heap)
Oklahoma! — Damon Daunno, Rebecca Naomi Jones, Ali Stroker, Mary Testa & Patrick Vaill, principal soloists; Daniel Kluger & Dean Sharenow, producers (Richard Rodgers, composer; Oscar Hammerstein II, lyricist) (2019 Broadway Cast)

MUSIC FOR VISUAL MEDIA

Best Compilation Soundtrack For Visual Media:

A Star Is Born — Lady Gaga & Bradley Cooper (WINNER)
The Lion King: The Songs — (Various Artists)
Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon A Time In Hollywood — (Various Artists)
Rocketman — Taron Egerton
Spider-Man: Into The Spider-Verse — (Various Artists)

Best Score Soundtrack For Visual Media:

Chernobyl — Hildur Guðnadóttir, composer (WINNER)
Avengers: Endgame — Alan Silvestri, composer
Game Of Thrones: Season 8 — Ramin Djawadi, composer
The Lion King — Hans Zimmer, composer
Mary Poppins Returns — Marc Shaiman, composer

Best Song Written For Visual Media:

“I’ll Never Love Again (Film Version)” — Natalie Hemby, Lady Gaga, Hillary Lindsey & Aaron Raitiere, songwriters (Lady Gaga & Bradley Cooper); Track from: A Star Is Born (WINNER)
“The Ballad Of The Lonesome Cowboy” — Randy Newman, songwriter (Chris Stapleton); Track from: “Toy Story 4”
“Girl In The Movies” — Dolly Parton & Linda Perry, songwriters (Dolly Parton); Track from: “Dumplin’”
“Spirit” — Beyoncé Knowles-Carter, Timothy McKenzie & Ilya Salmanzadeh, songwriters (Beyoncé); Track from: “The Lion King”
“Suspirium” — Thom Yorke, songwriter (Thom Yorke); Track from: “Suspiria”

COMPOSING/ARRANGING

Best Instrumental Composition:

“Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge Symphonic Suite” — John Williams, composer (John Williams) (WINNER)
“Begin Again” — Fred Hersch, composer (Fred Hersch & The WDR Big Band Conducted By Vince Mendoza)
“Crucible For Crisis” — Brian Lynch, composer (Brian Lynch Big Band)
“Love, A Beautiful Force” — Vince Mendoza, composer (Vince Mendoza, Terell Stafford, Dick Oatts & Temple University Studio Orchestra)
“Walkin’ Funny” — Christian McBride, composer (Christian McBride)

Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella:

“Moon River” — Jacob Collier, arranger (Jacob Collier) (WINNER)
“Blue Skies” — Kris Bowers, arranger (Kris Bowers)
“Hedwig’s Theme” — John Williams, arranger (Anne-Sophie Mutter & John Williams)
“La Novena” — Emilio Solla, arranger (Emilio Solla Tango Jazz Orchestra)
“Love, A Beautiful Force” — Vince Mendoza, arranger (Vince Mendoza, Terell Stafford, Dick Oatts & Temple University Studio Orchestra)

Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals:

“All Night Long” — Jacob Collier, arranger (Jacob Collier Featuring Jules Buckley, Take 6 & Metropole Orkest) (WINNER)
“Jolene” — Geoff Keezer, arranger (Sara Gazarek)
“Marry Me A Little” — Cyrille Aimée & Diego Figueiredo, arrangers (Cyrille Aimée)
“Over The Rainbow” — Vince Mendoza, arranger (Trisha Yearwood)
“12 Little Spells (Thoracic Spine)” — Esperanza Spalding, arranger (Esperanza Spalding)

PACKAGE

Best Recording Package:

Chris Cornell — Barry Ament, Jeff Ament, Jeff Fura & Joe Spix, art directors (Chris Cornell) (WINNER)
Anónimas & Resilientes — Luisa María Arango, Carlos Dussan, Manuel García-Orozco & Juliana Jaramillo-Buenaventura, art directors (Voces Del Bullerengue)
Hold That Tiger — Andrew Wong & Fongming Yang, art directors (The Muddy Basin Ramblers)
i,i — Aaron Anderson & Eric Timothy Carlson, art directors (Bon Iver)
Intellexual — Irwan Awalludin, art director (Intellexual)

Best Boxed or Special Limited Edition Package:

Woodstock: Back To The Garden – The Definitive 50th Anniversary Archive — Masaki Koike, art director (Various Artists) (WINNER)
Anima — Stanley Donwood & Tchocky, art directors (Thom Yorke)
Gold In Brass Age — Amanda Chiu, Mark Farrow & David Gray, art directors (David Gray)
1963: New Directions — Josh Cheuse, art director (John Coltrane)
The Radio Recordings 1939–1945 — Marek Polewski, art director (Wilhelm Furtwängler & Berliner Philharmoniker)

NOTES

Best Album Notes:

Stax ’68: A Memphis Story — Steve Greenberg, album notes writer (Various Artists) (WINNER)
The Complete Cuban Jam Sessions — Judy Cantor-Navas, album notes writer (Various Artists)
The Gospel According To Malaco — Robert Marovich, album notes writer (Various Artists)
Pedal Steel + Four Corners — Brendan Greaves, album notes writer (Terry Allen And The Panhandle Mystery Band)
Pete Seeger: The Smithsonian Folkways Collection — Jeff Place, album notes writer (Pete Seeger)

HISTORICAL

Best Historical Album:

Pete Seeger: The Smithsonian Folkways Collection — Jeff Place & Robert Santelli, compilation producers; Pete Reiniger, mastering engineer (Pete Seeger) (WINNER)
The Girl From Chickasaw County – The Complete Capitol Masters — Andrew Batt & Kris Maher, compilation producers; Simon Gibson, mastering engineer (Bobbie Gentry)
The Great Comeback: Horowitz At Carnegie Hall — Robert Russ, compilation producer; Andreas K. Meyer & Jennifer Nulsen, mastering engineers (Vladimir Horowitz)
Kankyo Ongaku: Japanese Ambient, Environmental & New Age Music 1980-1990 — Spencer Doran, Yosuke Kitazawa, Douglas Macgowan & Matt Sullivan, compilation producers; John Baldwin, mastering engineer (Various Artists)
Woodstock: Back To The Garden – The Definitive 50th Anniversary Archive — Brian Kehew, Steve Woolard & Andy Zax, compilation producers; Dave Schultz, mastering engineer, Brian Kehew, restoration engineer (Various Artists)

PRODUCTION, NON-CLASSICAL

Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical:

When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go? — Rob Kinelski & Finneas O’Connell, engineers; John Greenham, mastering engineer (Billie Eilish) (WINNER)
All These Things — Tchad Blake, Adam Greenspan & Rodney Shearer, engineers; Bernie Grundman, mastering engineer (Thomas Dybdahl)
Ella Mai — Chris “Shaggy” Ascher, Jaycen Joshua & David Pizzimenti, engineers; Chris Athens, mastering engineer (Ella Mai)
Run Home Slow — Paul Butler & Sam Teskey, engineers; Joe Carra, mastering engineer (The Teskey Brothers)
Scenery — Tom Elmhirst, Ben Kane & Jeremy Most, engineers; Bob Ludwig, mastering engineer (Emily King)

Producer Of The Year, Non-Classical:

Finneas (WINNER)
Jack Antonoff
Dan Auerbach
John Hill
Ricky Reed

Best Remixed Recording:

“I Rise (Tracy Young’s Pride Intro Radio Remix)” — Tracy Young, remixer (Madonna) (WINNER)
“Mother’s Daughter (Wuki Remix)” — Wuki, remixer (Miley Cyrus)
“The One (High Contrast Remix)”– Lincoln Barrett, remixer (Jorja Smith)
“Swim (Ford. Remix)” — Luc Bradford, remixer (Mild Minds)
“Work It (Soulwax Remix)” — David Gerard C Dewaele & Stephen Antoine C Dewaele, remixers (Marie Davidson)

PRODUCTION, IMMERSIVE AUDIO

Best Immersive Audio Album:

Lux — Morten Lindberg, immersive audio engineer; Morten Lindberg, immersive audio mastering engineer; Morten Lindberg, immersive audio producer (Anita Brevik, Trondheimsolistene & Nidarosdomens Jentekor) (WINNER)
Chain Tripping — Luke Argilla, immersive audio engineer; Jurgen Scharpf, immersive audio mastering engineer; Jona Bechtolt, Claire L. Evans & Rob Kieswetter, immersive audio producers (Yacht)
Kverndokk: Symphonic Dances — Jim Anderson, immersive audio engineer; Robert C. Ludwig, immersive audio mastering engineer; Ulrike Schwarz, immersive audio producer (Ken-David Masur & Stavanger Symphony Orchestra)
The Orchestral Organ — Keith O. Johnson, immersive audio engineer; Keith O. Johnson, immersive audio mastering engineer; Marina A. Ledin & Victor Ledin, immersive audio producers (Jan Kraybill)
The Savior — Bob Clearmountain, immersive audio engineer; Bob Ludwig, immersive audio mastering engineer; Michael Marquart & Dave Way, immersive audio producers (A Bad Think)

PRODUCTION, CLASSICAL

Best Engineered Album, Classical:

Riley: Sun Rings — Leslie Ann Jones, engineer; Robert C. Ludwig, mastering engineer (Kronos Quartet) (WINNER)
Aequa – Anna Thorvaldsdóttir — Daniel Shores, engineer; Daniel Shores, mastering engineer (International Contemporary Ensemble)
Bruckner: Symphony No. 9 — Mark Donahue, engineer; Mark Donahue, mastering engineer (Manfred Honeck & Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra)
Rachmaninoff – Hermitage Piano Trio — Keith O. Johnson & Sean Royce Martin, engineers; Keith O. Johnson, mastering engineer (Hermitage Piano Trio)
Wolfe: Fire In My Mouth — Bob Hanlon & Lawrence Rock, engineers; Ian Good & Lawrence Rock, mastering engineers (Jaap Van Zweden, Francisco J. Núñez, Donald Nally, The Crossing, Young People’s Chorus Of NY City & New York Philharmonic)

Producer Of The Year, Classical:

Blanton Alspaugh (WINNER)
James Ginsburg
Marina A. Ledin, Victor Ledin
Morten Lindberg
Dirk Sobotka

CLASSICAL

Best Orchestral Performance:

“Norman: Sustain” — Gustavo Dudamel, conductor (Los Angeles Philharmonic) (WINNER)
“Bruckner: Symphony No. 9” — Manfred Honeck, conductor (Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra)
“Copland: Billy The Kid; Grohg” — Leonard Slatkin, conductor (Detroit Symphony Orchestra)
“Transatlantic” — Louis Langrée, conductor (Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra)
“Weinberg: Symphonies Nos. 2 & 21” — Mirga Gražinytė-tyla, conductor (City Of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra & Kremerata Baltica)

Best Opera Recording:

“Picker: Fantastic Mr. Fox” — Gil Rose, conductor; John Brancy, Andrew Craig Brown, Gabriel Preisser, Krista River & Edwin Vega; Gil Rose, producer (Boston Modern Orchestra Project; Boston Children’s Chorus) (WINNER)
“Benjamin: Lessons In Love & Violence” — George Benjamin, conductor; Stéphane Degout, Barbara Hannigan, Peter Hoare & Gyula Orendt; James Whitbourn, producer (Orchestra Of The Royal Opera House)
“Berg: Wozzeck” — Marc Albrecht, conductor; Christopher Maltman & Eva-Maria Westbroek; François Roussillon, producer (Netherlands Philharmonic Orchestra; Chorus Of Dutch National Opera)
“Charpentier: Les Arts Florissants; Les Plaisirs De Versailles” — Paul O’Dette & Stephen Stubbs, conductors; Jesse Blumberg, Teresa Wakim & Virginia Warnken; Renate Wolter-Seevers, producer (Boston Early Music Festival Chamber Ensemble; Boston Early Music Festival Vocal Ensemble)
“Wagner: Lohengrin” — Christian Thielemann, conductor; Piotr Beczała, Anja Harteros, Tomasz Konieczny, Waltraud Meier & Georg Zeppenfeld; Eckhard Glauche, producer (Festspielorchester Bayreuth; Festspielchor Bayreuth)

Best Choral Performance:

“Duruflé: Complete Choral Works” — Robert Simpson, conductor (Ken Cowan; Houston Chamber Choir) (WINNER)
“Boyle: Voyages” — Donald Nally, conductor (The Crossing)
“The Hope Of Loving” — Craig Hella Johnson, conductor (Conspirare)
“Sander: The Divine Liturgy Of St. John Chrysostom” — Peter Jermihov, conductor (Evan Bravos, Vadim Gan, Kevin Keys, Glenn Miller & Daniel Shirley; PaTRAM Institute Singers)
“Smith, K.: The Arc In The Sky” — Donald Nally, conductor (The Crossing)

Best Chamber Music/Small Ensemble Performance:

“Shaw: Orange” — Attacca Quartet (WINNER)
“Cerrone: The Pieces That Fall To Earth” — Christopher Rountree & Wild Up
“Freedom & Faith” — Publiquartet
“Perpetulum” — Third Coast Percussion
“Rachmaninoff” – Hermitage Piano Trio — Hermitage Piano Trio

Best Classical Instrumental Solo:

“Marsalis: Violin Concerto; Fiddle Dance Suite” — Nicola Benedetti; Cristian Măcelaru, conductor (Philadelphia Orchestra) (WINNER)
“The Berlin Recital” — Yuja Wang
“Higdon: Harp Concerto” — Yolanda Kondonassis; Ward Stare, conductor (The Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra)
“The Orchestral Organ” — Jan Kraybill
“Torke: Sky, Concerto For Violin” — Tessa Lark; David Alan Miller, conductor (Albany Symphony)

Best Classical Solo Vocal Album:

Songplay — Joyce Didonato; Chuck Israels, Jimmy Madison, Charlie Porter & Craig Terry, accompanists (Steve Barnett & Lautaro Greco) (WINNER)
The Edge Of Silence – Works For Voice By György Kurtág — Susan Narucki (Donald Berman, Curtis Macomber, Kathryn Schulmeister & Nicholas Tolle)
Himmelsmusik — Philippe Jaroussky & Céline Scheen; Christina Pluhar, conductor; L’arpeggiata, ensemble (Jesús Rodil & Dingle Yandell)
Schumann: Liederkreis Op. 24, Kerner-lieder Op. 35 — Matthias Goerne; Leif Ove Andsnes, accompanist
A Te, O Cara — Stephen Costello; Constantine Orbelian, conductor (Kaunas City Symphony Orchestra)

Best Classical Compendium:

The Poetry Of Places — Nadia Shpachenko; Marina A. Ledin & Victor Ledin, producers (WINNER)
American Originals 1918 — John Morris Russell, conductor; Elaine Martone, producer
Leshnoff: Symphony No. 4 ‘heichalos’; Guitar Concerto; Starburst — Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor; Tim Handley, producer
Meltzer: Songs And Structures — Paul Appleby & Natalia Katyukova; Silas Brown & Harold Meltzer, producers
Saariaho: True Fire; Trans; Ciel D’hiver — Hannu Lintu, conductor; Laura Heikinheimo, producer

Best Contemporary Classical Composition:

Higdon: Harp Concerto — Jennifer Higdon, composer (Yolanda Kondonassis, Ward Stare & The Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra) (WINNER)
Bermel: Migration Series For Jazz Ensemble & Orchestra — Derek Bermel, composer (Derek Bermel, Ted Nash, David Alan Miller, Juilliard Jazz Orchestra & Albany Symphony Orchestra)
Marsalis: Violin Concerto In D Major — Wynton Marsalis, composer (Nicola Benedetti, Cristian Măcelaru & Philadelphia Orchestra)
Norman: Sustain — Andrew Norman, composer (Gustavo Dudamel & Los Angeles Philharmonic)
Shaw: Orange — Caroline Shaw, composer (Attacca Quartet)
Wolfe: Fire In My Mouth — Julia Wolfe, composer (Jaap Van Zweden, Francisco J. Núñez, Donald Nally, The Crossing, Young People’s Chorus Of NY City & New York Philharmonic)

MUSIC VIDEO/FILM

Best Music Video:

“Old Town Road (Official Movie)” — Lil Nas X & Billy Ray Cyrus, Calmatic, video director; Candice Dragonas, Melissa Larsen & Saul Levitz, video producers (WINNER)
“We’ve Got To Try” — The Chemical Brothers, Ellie Fry, video director; Ninian Doff, video producer
“This Land” — Gary Clark Jr., Savanah Leaf, video director; Alicia Martinez, video producer
“Cellophane” — FKA twigs, Andrew Thomas Huang, video director; Alex Chamberlain, video producer
“Glad He’s Gone” — Tove Lo, Vania Heymann & Gal Muggia, video directors; Natan Schottenfels, video producer

Best Music Film:

HOMECOMING — Beyoncé, Beyoncé Knowles-Carter & Ed Burke, video directors; Dora Melissa Vargas, video producer (WINNER)
Remember My Name — David Crosby, A.J. Eaton, video director; Cameron Crowe, Michele Farinola & Greg Mariotti, video producers
Birth Of The Cool — Miles Davis, Stanley Nelson, video director; Nicole London, video producer
Shangri-la — Various Artists,Morgan Neville, video director; Emma Baiada, video producer
Anima — Thom Yorke, Paul Thomas Anderson, video director; Paul Thomas Anderson, Erica Frauman & Sara Murphy, video producers


I had never wanted Burna boy to win the Grammy – Lady..


A Nigerian therapist identified as Oyinkansola Alabi, has reacted to Burna Boy’s loss at last night Grammy Awards.

Oyinkansola said that although she loves Burna Boy’s diligence, she however, she didn’t want him to win the much coveted award as she was ”scared of his attitude towards fame and money.”


Her facebook post reads ;

“Even though I love his diligence, I really didn’t want him to win. I thought the Grammy award would ruin him. I was scared of his attitude towards fame and money.

I however, think that his real award is the global recognition and the fact that he contested with a legend. So congratulations, Oluwaburna, may God increase your greatness and may you find him.”


#Newsworthy…

7+ Nigerians who have been nominated for Grammy award and winners


The 62nd Annual Grammy Awards ceremony is scheduled for today January 26, 2020, at the Staples Center in Los Angeles, United States. It will recognize the best recordings, compositions, and artists from October 1, 2018 to August 31, 2019.

Nigerian singer Damini Ebunoluwa Ogulu, better known as Burna Boy is in the race for the Best World Music Album category.

He is competing for the award with Altin Gun (Gece), Nathalie Joachim and Angelique Kidjo(Celia).

Burna Boy: Nigerians expect him to win the Grammys on Sunday

Expectations are high in Nigeria that Burna Boy will win the Award with his ‘African Giant, multiple award-winning album.

Here are Nigerians who have won the awards in the past:

Sade Adu

Sade Adu:

Sade Adu, British-Nigerian singer, who turned 61 on 16 January, 2020 has been one of Nigeria’s most successful singers. While the likes of Olamide, Davido, Tiwa Savage, Small Doctor, Phyno, and the rest have never dreamt of winning a Grammy Award, Sadu Adu made history as the first Nigerian singer to have won a Grammy.

Born on January 16, 1959, in Ibadan, Nigeria, Sade was raised in London. He had been nominated for the Grammy awards nine times and won four times.

She won her first Grammy in 1986 in the Best New Artist category. She also won the Best R&B Performance by a duo or group with vocals in 1994 for the song, “No Ordinary Love.”

Sade Adu also won another Grammy in 2002 in the category of the Best Pop Vocal Album, with the song “Lovers Rock,” while in 2011, she won the Best R&B Performance by a group with vocals for “Soldier of Love.”

Sikiru Adepoju

Sikiru Adepoju:

69 year-old Sikiru Adepoju is a percussionist and recording artist from Nigeria, primarily in the genres of traditional African music and world music. He plays a variety of instruments and styles.

Born in Eruwa, Oyo State, Adepoju was a member of Ebenezer Obey’s Inter Reformers Band until he left for the US in 1985. In the US, the ‘drummer boy’ joined O. J. Ekemode’s Nigerian All-Stars, and three months later met Babatunde Olatunji.

He became an integral part of Olatunji’s Drums of Passion, and through Olatunji met Grateful Dead drummer Mickey Hart

Mickey Hart and Adepoju in 2009 with their Grammys

He was part of Mickey Hart’s group Planet Drum, whose title album won the Grammy Award for Best Contemporary World Music Album in 1991, the first year there was a Grammy in that category. He was also part of Mickey Hart’s latest group Global Drum Project, whose title album won the Grammy Award for Best Contemporary World Music Album at the 51st annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles 8 February 2009.

Olalekan Babalola

Olalekan Babalola:

Lekan Babalola, born in 1960, is a Nigerian jazz percussionist and musician. Born in Lagos State, Nigeria where he began playing the conga at a young age, he has released seven albums and jointly won two Grammy Awards.

After primary and secondary education in Agege Lagos and Iwo in Oyo state, he left Nigeria for England in 1980 to study automobile engineering at the Chelsea College of Aeronautical and Automobile Engineering.

He however dropped the engineering programme for music and later enrolled at the Central Saint Martin’s College of Art and Design where he studied filmmaking. He later went to to the Northern Film School for a master’s degree.

After crossing the Atlantic to the US, he began his musical career with the Samba Samba Band and later New York City-based Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers band, where he perfected playing the Bongo drums and performing jazz music. Upon his return to the U.K, Babalola later went on to work with notable acts including Prince, Ernest Ranglin, Branford Marsalis, African Jazz All Stars, Roy Ayers, David Byrne, Damon Albarn, Tony Allen amongst others. In 2006, he won his first Grammy Award for his work on Ali Farka Touré’s In the Heart of the Moon in which he was credited in three tracks. He also won a second Grammy in 2009 for his work on Cassandra Wilson’s 2008 album titled Loverly.

Hakeem-Seriki, a.k.a Chamillionaire

Hakeem Seriki:

Nigerian-American Hakeem Seriki, better known by his stage name Chamillionaire is a rapper, entrepreneur, and investor from Houston, Texas. He was born November 28, 1979 in Washington D.C to a Muslim Nigerian father and an African-American Christian mother. He moved to Houston, Texas at the age of four

He began his career independently with local releases in 2002, including the collaborative album Get Ya Mind Correct with fellow Houston rapper and childhood friend Paul Wall. He signed to Universal Records in 2005 and released The Sound of Revenge under Universal. It included hit singles “Turn It Up” featuring Lil’ Flip and the number-one, Grammy-winning hit “Ridin’” featuring Krayzie Bone of Bone Thugs-n-Harmony. The song won the Grammy in 2007 for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group. It was also nominated for Best Rap song.

Chamillionaire is also known for his most anticipated Mixtape Messiah series, which ran from 2004 until 2009.

He currently serves as the CEO of Chamillitary Entertainment. Chamillionaire was also the founder and an original member of the Color Changin’ Click until the group split in 2005.

Kevin Olusola

Kevin Olusola:

Kevin Olusola, born October 5, 1988 is a Nigerian-American musician, beatboxer, cellist, rapper, record producer, singer, and songwriter. He is also a polyglot.

He was born in Owensboro, Kentucky, to Nigerian-born Oluwole Olusola, a psychiatrist, and Grenadian-born Curline Paul, a nurse.

Olusola’s parents discovered his musical talent when he was six months old and decided to put him in music lessons. He started the piano at age 4, the cello at age 6, and alto sax

Olusola is best known as the beatboxer of the vocal band Pentatonix. After the group won NBC’s The Sing-Off in 2011, they released five albums, which all charted in the top 5 of the Billboard 200 charts, have sold over 2 million records, and have amassed more than two billion views on their YouTube channel.

His group won the Grammys in 2015 and 2016 for Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella. The group also won in 2017 for Best Country Duo/Group Performance for the song Jolene, which featured Dolly Parton.

At Yale, Olusola planned to pursue medicine and finished all his pre-med requirements. He started as an academic music major, but decided to switch to East Asian Studies after being introduced to China through a 10-day Chinese government sponsored trip for 100 Yale students.

Henry Olusegun Adeola Samuel a.k.a Seal

Henry Olusegun Adeola Samuel, a k.a Seal

He is a British-Nigerian musician, singer, and songwriter. He has sold over 20 million records worldwide, with his first international hit song, “Crazy”, released in 1991; his most celebrated song, “Kiss from a Rose”, was released in 1994.

He is one of the most decorated of musicians with Nigerian background.

Seal had won three Brit Awards; he won Best British Male in 1992, as well as four Grammy Awards and an MTV Video Music Award.

He was born on 19 February 1963 at St Mary’s Hospital in Paddington, London, to Nigerian mother, Adebisi Ogundeji, and Afro-Brazilian father, Francis Samuel. He was raised by a foster family in Westminster, London.

Seal married the German model Heidi Klum in 2005 but divorced in 2014, after four kids.

He had been nominated 14 times for Grammys and won four titles.

He won Record of the Year and Song of the Year in 1996. He also won Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals in 2011. Last year, his song Standard was nominated for Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album.

Cynthia Erivo

Cynthia Erivo:

A British-Nigerian actress, singer and song writer, who played the lead role in the biopic Harriet and was nominated for several awards. Her full name is : Cynthia Onyedinmanasu Chinasaokwu Erivo. She was born in Stockwell England on 8 January, 1987.

Cynthia is multi-talented. Apart from picking awards in theatre and cinema, she also won a Grammy Award for Best Musical Theater Album in 2017 for Colour Purple.

King Sunny Ade (KSA): nominated twice for Grammys

Nigerians nominated for the award in the past:

King Sunny Ade: The 73 year-old African beats singer first got nominated for a Grammys in 1984 for his Synchro System album. It was in the category ‘Best ethnic or traditional folk recording’.

In 1999, KSA was nominated again for Best World Music award, this time for his Odu album.

Femi Kuti: received four nominations

Femi Kuti

Earned nomination in 2003 for his album ‘Fight to win’.

In 2010, he was nominated again for ‘Day by day’. In 2012, he was nominated for ‘Africa for Africa’. His last nomination was in 2014, for Best World Music Award over his work, No place for my Dream.

Seun Kuti.

Femi Kuti’s younger brother was nominated in 2018 for his work ‘Black Times’.

Michael Babatunde Olatunji:

Michael Babatunde Olatunji

Michael Babatunde Olatunji, Nigeria’s most accomplished drummer who died on April 6, 2003 was nominated in 1998 for Love Drum Talk.

Olatunji who was born in the village of Ajido, near Badagry, Lagos State, moved to the United States on a Rotary International Scholarship in 1950. Educated at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia and New York University, Olatunji began his music career by starting a percussion group to make money to fund his studies.

He built a great following among Jazz musicians and had collaborations with many artistes such as John Coltrane who wrote the composition “Tunji” on the 1962 album Coltrane in dedication to him. Olatunji recorded with many other prominent musicians (often credited as “Michael Olatunji”), including Cannonball Adderley (on his 1961 African Waltz album), Horace Silver, Quincy Jones, Pee Wee Ellis, Stevie Wonder, Randy Weston, and with Max Roach and Abbey Lincoln on the pivotal Freedom Now Suite aka We Insist!, and with Grateful Dead member Mickey Hart on his Grammy winning Planet Drum projects. He is also mentioned in the lyrics of Bob Dylan’s “I Shall Be Free” as recorded on the album The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan.

Burna Boy

Nominated for Best World Music Album for his work, African Giant. Will he win?


#Newsworthy…

(Check) Nigerian Nominees who lost the Grammy award..


It’s Grammy night, biggest music awards night holding at the Staples Center in Los Angeles, United States. It will recognize the best recordings, compositions, and artists from October 1, 2018, to August 31, 2019.

Nigerian singer Damini Ebunoluwa Ogulu, better known as Burna Boy is in the race for the Best World Music Album category. He is competing for the award with Altin Gun (Gece), Bokanté & Metropole Orkest Conducted By Jules Buckley (What Heat), Nathalie Joachim With Spektral Quartet (Fanm D’ayiti) and Angelique Kidjo (Celia).

While we are counting down to the big show, we would like to take a trip down memory lane and bring you four times Nigerians have been nominated for the World Best Music Category of the prestigious award.


The Best World Music Album category recognizes performers outside the United States who showcase non-European, indigenous influences in their body of work. The award was first handed out in 1992 to Mickey Hart.

See below the Nigerians that have earned Grammy nominations in World Best Music Category:

King Sunny Ade

Chief Sunday Adeniyi Adegeye is a juju singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist.

The living legend, King Sunny Ade, has been nominated for a Grammy twice. The first time was in 1983 in the Best Ethnic or Traditional Folk Recording for his album ‘Synchro System’. The second time was in 1998 for his ‘Odu’ album in the Best World Music category.

Babatunde Olatunji

Michael Babatunde Olatunji

Babatunde Olatunji (April 7, 1927 – April 6, 2003) was a Nigerian drummer, educator, social activist, and recording artist. Olatunji was nominated once for his album Love Drum Talk in 1998.

Femi Kuti

Femi Kuti: received four nominations.

Olufela Olufemi Anikulapo Kuti is the eldest son of Afrobeat pioneer Fela Kuti and a grandchild of a political campaigner, women’s rights activist and traditional aristocrat Funmilayo Ransome Kuti. He began his musical career playing in his father’s band, Egypt 80.

Femi Kuti has the highest grammy nominations in Nigeria, he has been nominated four times.

Fight to Win in 2002, Day by Day in 2010, the definitive album that helped to establish Femi as a true original with his own unique style. Africa for Africa in 2012 and “No Place for My Dream” in 2014.

Seun Kuti

Seun Kuti

Oluseun Anikulapo Kuti the youngest son of famous afrobeat pioneer Fela Kuti. Seun leads his father’s former band Egypt 80.

Seun fetched his first Grammy nomination with his album Black Times in 2019. His nomination came on the heels of his older brother Femi who had been nominated four times in the category. It also marked the first time two brothers have been nominated in the same Grammy category.


#Newsworthy…

2020 Grammy: Late Nipsey wins Best Rap Performance..


The 2020 Grammy for Best Rap Performance has been posthumously awarded to rapper, activist, and entrepreneur, Ermias Joseph Asghedom popularly known as Nipsey Hussle.


Roddy Ricch and Hit-Boy also won for the song “Racks in the Middle.”

The other nominees in the category were J. Cole (“MIDDLE CHILD” and the Dreamville posse cut “Down Bad”), Offset and Cardi B (“Clout”), and DaBaby (“Suge”).


This is Nipsey Hussle’s first Grammy win.

In an emotional acceptance speech, Nipsey Hussle’s grandmother who led the family to collect his award said, “I wanted to thank all of you for showing all the love that I have felt for him all of his life and will always live in my heart, so: thank you. Thank you. Thank you.”


Throughout his lifetime, Nipsey Hussle was a respected artist and activist in the hip-hop world, and it wasn’t until he finally released his debut album Victory Lap in early 2018 that he broke out as a proper superstar.

Hussle was shot multiple times in the parking lot of his store, Marathon Clothing, in South Los Angeles at about 3:19 pm on March 31, 2019.

He was only 33 when he died.

His alleged killer, Eric Holder, who has been charged with murder, two counts of attempted murder and one count of possession of a firearm by a felon is currently awaiting trial.


#Newsworthy…

Beninese singer dedicates ‘Best Music Album’ to Burna Boy..


The Beninese singer Angélique Kidjo has dedicated her Grammy award in the World Best Music Album Category to Nigerian singer Burna Boy.

Angelique Kidjo defeated Burna Boy, Altin Gün, Bokanté & Metropole Orkest Conducted By Jules Buckley, Nathalie Joachim & Spektral Quartet to win the award on Sunday.

Kidjo won, for the fourth time, leaving Burna Boy still waiting to win his first.


However, Kidjo saluted Burna Boy and said that he is changing Africa

“Four years ago on this stage, I was telling you that the new generation of artists coming from Africa are going to take you by storm.

“And the time has come. This is for Burna Boy.

“Burna Boy is among those young artists that come from Africa that is changing the way our continent is perceived and the way African music has been the bedrock of every music,” BBC Africa quoted Angelique Kidjo.


#Newsworthy…

2020 Grammy: What are your expectations tonight!!!


Tonight is the slated date for the prestigious Grammy Award night and we’re trooping to support our very own Burna Boy.
If we don’t support and wish the African Giant well, who will? Absolutely no one! That’s why we bringing up this post we can drop our well wishes and prayers for Burna Boy.

We can all recall, Burna Boy’s “African Giant” album was nominated under the “Best World Music” category alongside 4 other strong contenders.


If Burna Boy wins this, then it’s a win for the whole of Nigeria, Hence, let’s show massive support our own Man no matter how small it might be.

Nigerians!!! and fans of Kind Burna…

Drop Your Well Wishes For Burna Boy In The Tonight Grammy Award

Let’s go!!!


#Newsworthy…

2020 Grammy: Wizkid celebrate Burna Boy..


Since Burna Boy was nominated for a Grammy Award, many Nigerian singers and celebrities have shown support for the African giant to bring the award home.

The latest celebrity to show his support for Burna Boy is Wizkid Ayo, who took to his Twitter page to stand by him.


Wizkid wrote,

King Burna! Bring it home! 💯🖤❤️🦅


#Newsworthy…

2020 Grammy: Burna Boy honored outset


Everyone knows it. Eyes are watching. Minds are rethinking possibilities. Music consumers and creatives alike have their hearts in their mouths, observing his every move for minute predictive clues ahead of the long-awaited moment.

There’s no gainsaying that there’s an unusual interest in Damini ‘Burna Boy’ Ogulu’s stake as the 28-year-old Afro-fusion singer stands a chance of snagging a plaque at the 2020 Grammys on Sunday evening — just one year after he dominated the limelight as an Afrocentric artiste.


It didn’t help our anxiety that Burna took to his Twitter — two days to the D-Day, asking if fans could “keep a secret” in a move that suggested he, PERHAPS, already got notified by the Academy that he’ll be getting an award, just so his presence is guaranteed.

But beyond wild speculations and hearsays, many would agree that a game-changing peculiarity heightening Burna’s chances ahead of the 62nd Grammys is the fact that his critically acclaimed ‘African Giant’ album came at a point when the west seems to finally be grasping the Afrobeat concept.


Burna Boy’s ‘African Giant’ sets new record on UK albums chart

While he further gained traction as a thriving creative in 2019, the singer had long had his grip on fame, joining forces with the likes of Wizkid in collaborative hits and drawing inspiration from Afrobeat pioneer Fela Kuti, before the global spotlight finally beamed on him.

Burna Boy before ‘African Giant’


Burna had debuted his first studio album ‘L.I.F.E’ in August 2013. This had come sequel to his 2011 mixtapes including ‘Burn Identity’ and is reported to have sold over 40,000 copies on the first day of its release alone.

Upon graduating from high school, the Port Harcourt-born music star had temporarily migrated to the United Kingdom, where he enrolled in college, but later gave up on tertiary education and returned to Nigeria to pursue his passion in music-making.


He had started making beats at 10 but kick-started his career in 2010 when he signed a two-year contract with Aristokrat Records, a label he later left in 2014 for his own imprint Spaceship Entertainment.

Fusing dancehall, reggae, Afro-beat, and pop, Burna Boy, over the course of time, emerged as one of Nigeria’s fastest rising stars, having paved way for himself in 2012 with his breakout single ‘Like to Party‘, which keeps topping playlists till date.


‘African Giant’ album & the Coachella font controversy

Aface his fast-growing fanbase within Nigeria and critical global acclaims trailing his collaborative projects with the likes of Lilly Allen and Fallout Boy, Burna had sold out his O2 Academy concert in 2018.


With three albums and two EPs to his name already — including ‘On a Spaceship’ and ‘Outside’ — the Afrofusion crooner, was, in no time, billed to showcase his skills to the world at the 2019 Coachella Festival alongside Mr Eazi, a Nigerian singer-cum-songwriter.

But, unlike many expected, Burna was soon in a face-off with organizers of the annual festival after he was unable to spot his name on the lineup while peering at the graphics from the comfort of his toilet seat.


Lashing out at Coachella, Burna flared up and dubbed himself an ‘African Giant’ after deeming the “writing of his name in small fonts,” unlike those of some other global stars — an attempt at belittling him.

Reacting to the disapproval from Nigerians, the then-enraged singer had quickly thrown words like “backward unprogressive fools,” adding that many citizens from the country aren’t mentally advanced enough to fight for themselves.

However, events succeeding these would later see him go on a rampage in serial media interviews to better explain himself and this single development further ushered the unorthodox “Afrofusion god” into the global limelight in no time.

Burna Boy’s potential win and the prospects for Afrobeats, Nigeria’s showbiz


As showbiz moguls looked to spritz their music style with deft touches of the much-acclaimed Afrobeat genre, Beyonce had joined the bandwagon and enlisted Burna Boy, among other Nigerian superstars, for her 2019 ‘Lion King’ project.

However, what augmented Burna’s international acclaim came to be that his successive studio album, which he later revealed was unplanned, came to bear an identical name with his then-controversial ‘African Giant’ mantra.

Burna Boy offers to support victims of Sudan crisis

As a result, many, both in Nigeria and in the diaspora, developed a keen interest in “whatever it is the singer had to offer.” In no time, the body of work ended up with massive numbers across streaming platforms, earning the singer a slew of awards and heated accolades.


From his BET win as the ‘Best International Act’ of 2019, Burna went ahead to snag AFRIMA’s plaque in the ‘Best Male Artiste in West Africa’ category, earning a nomination for the 2020 Grammys.

While we can only make predictions, watch the D-day play out, and analyze the impacts of a possible win, there are many that are confident about Burna’s chances, after having observed the manner in which fans readily chanted the singer’s name for his categories at the 2019 AFRIMA.

Amid the rapidly intensifying scramble for Africa, a Grammy to Burna Boy’s name could potentially open the floodgates of showbiz deals unlike ever before, not for the singer alone, but for Nigeria’s many creatives as well.

This could also rub off on Nollywood and augment the industry’s recent successes — with many Africa-oriented narratives waiting to be re-told. Perhaps it might also change the perspective of Nigerian creatives who have long been said to have a penchant for edging toward eurocentrism.


#Newsworthy…