Category Archives: North America – United Mexican States (Mexico)

COVID-19: President Andres Manuel of Mexico speaks on his health.

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The left-wing populist, who has a history of heart problems and hypertension, announced on January 24 that he was undergoing treatment for the coronavirus.

Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said Monday that he had overcome the coronavirus as he resumed his daily news conference after more than two weeks in isolation.

“I thank all Mexicans, men and women, who worried about my illness because of my Covid infection. Fortunately, I got through it,” said the 67-year-old, who as usual wore no mask.

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“We are back on our feet and fighting,” he told reporters gathered at the National Palace.

Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador speaks during his daily press conference at the Palacio Nacional, in Mexico City, on February 8, 2021. – Lopez Obrador resumed his official activities at his morning conference on Monday after recovering from COVID-19, which was diagnosed on January 24. (Photo by ALFREDO ESTRELLA / AFP)

The left-wing populist, who has a history of heart problems and hypertension, announced on January 24 that he was undergoing treatment for the coronavirus.

Last Thursday Lopez Obrador said that he had tested negative for Covid-19 and was awaiting the results of further testing to confirm he no longer had the virus.

According to the government’s brief updates on his condition, he had experienced brief episodes of low-grade fever and a slight headache.

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The Mexican leader has been criticized for refusing to wear a mask except on rare occasions and accused by critics of downplaying the risks of the virus early in the pandemic.

Mexico has officially registered around 1.9 million coronavirus cases and more than 166,000 deaths, one of the world’s highest fatality tolls.

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Mexican authority found 4 out of 19 bodies burnt near US border.

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The region is regularly the scene of clashes between the North West cartel, which controls part of Nuevo Leon, and the Gulf cartel, which has been present in Tamaulipas for decades.

Mexico has identified at least four of the 19 bodies found shot and burnt near the US border, prosecutors said Saturday.

Two Guatemalans — believed to be migrants — and two Mexicans were identified by their DNA after authorities discovered the bodies on January 22, the prosecutor’s office in the northern state of Tamaulipas said in a statement.

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It said members of the Interior Ministry’s national search commission had been added to the investigation for “greater transparency”, in collaboration with the foreign ministry and the Guatemalan embassy in Mexico.

“It was determined that 16 correspond to the male sex, one to the female sex, and two are pending clarification” due to the severity of the burning, the prosecutors said.

A team of forensics experts, dentists, geneticists and criminology specialists has been formed to identify the victims.

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Residents of the Guatemalan town of Comitancillo suspect at least a dozen of the victims are their relatives, according to authorities in the Central American country.

Authorities in Tamaulipas, who worked with the neighbouring state of Nuevo Leon, established that 113 bullets were fired into a vehicle where the bodies were found.

Tamaulipas, on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico, is the shortest route to the United States from Guatemala, but it is dangerous because of the presence of gangs that kidnap, extort, and murder migrants.

Mexico is experiencing a wave of violence linked to organized crime, especially drug cartels that vie for control of the routes to the US.

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The rate of violence has grown steadily in the country since the end of 2006, when the government handed the anti-narcotics file to the army. More than 300,000 murders have taken place since that date, according to official figures.

Mexico recorded 34,523 murders in 2020, down slightly from 2019, which was a record year since the government began tracking them in 1997.

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Central Mexico City Attack: Five loses to death.

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Local media reports said one of the victims was a member of the local Union Tepito cartel but city authorities have not confirmed this.

Five people were shot dead in central Mexico City, the local security secretariat said Saturday, a rare attack in the capital and likely linked to organized crime, according to local media.

The attack occurred late Friday at the town hall in Miguel Hidalgo, one of the most prosperous districts of Mexico City.

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Police responding to an alert found “five people on the ground with gunshot wounds,” according to a statement.

Medical services certified three men dead at the scene while the other two were transferred to a nearby hospital where they later died due to the seriousness of their injuries, the security secretariat said.

Despite growing drug cartel violence in Mexico over the last decade, shootings and multiple killings are rare in the capital compared to other areas of the country.

However, the city was shocked by an attack in June last year on its security chief, Omar Garcia Harfuch, by heavily armed gunmen who killed two of his bodyguards and a passerby.

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Garcia Harfuch, who was wounded, blamed the attack on the powerful Jalisco New Generation drug cartel.

More than 300,000 people have been murdered since Mexico deployed the military to fight the drug cartels in 2006, with most of the killings blamed on organized crime.

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COVID-19: There may be vaccines delay amid tests setback – Mexico

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The Latin American roll-out of a potential COVID-19 vaccine made by AstraZeneca could be set back after the biotech company announced a pause in tests, the government of Mexico, which is involved in developing the drug alongside Argentina, said Tuesday.

AstraZeneca, which is working on a vaccine in conjunction with Oxford University, said that a volunteer had developed an undiagnosed illness and that, in line with security protocols, it was delaying further tests until an independent panel had studied the case.

Pausing vaccine trials “is not an unusual occurrence… and as a consequence the vaccine’s arrival may be delayed” across the region, said Hugo Lopez Gatell, Mexico’s undersecretary for health, at a press conference on the latest development.

Gatell asked that people avoid speculation about the safety of the vaccine, especially given that it is considered to be one of the most promising projects under development in the western world.

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Mexico and Argentina have signed an agreement to work together with the Swedish-British pharmaceutical company.

Under the plan, some 250 million doses of the vaccine would be sold at cost across Latin America, with the exception of Brazil, which has its own agreements.

Mexico will also work with other labs in Europe, China and Russia in vaccine development projects, although AstraZeneca is the only one that has guaranteed distribution across Latin America.

With a population of almost 129 million people, Mexico had suffered 68,484 fatalities from the virus by Tuesday, with 642,860 cases of Covid-19


#Newsworthy…